This is a great resource. I’ use a variety of essential oils. I have a drawer full. Some from Young Living, Simply Earth, Do Terra and Isagenix. There are many good brands but I think people get nervous about trying new brands especially when they’ve heard from well-meaning friends that only the MLM versions are safe. While I do think MLM brands are tested extensively because they are held to very high standards and don’t want to get shut down there are some non-mlm oil brands you can safely buy especially if you plan to use them in your diffuser. I wouldn’t ingest an oil unless the bottle specifically states you can. For ingesting the brands I use right now are Isagenix and Young Living (I’m sure there are others that are safe but these state they are ingestable). I’ve written many posts about how to use oils and I switch out brands depending on my needs and what I have on hand.
Developing essential oil standards for essential oil therapy/aromatherapy has been discussed in several circles over the years, but because of cost of administration, setting up labs, certifying them and the analysis cost all by itself, it has turned out to be an overwhelming task and cost that only a well-organized and well funded organization could handle. But, an organizational attempt to deal with the analytical and administrative challenge for self-regulation would be desirable before essential oil therapy/aromatherapy looses its “therapy” from an overdose of bad oils.

So, between their “extra” or more extensive methods of testing, their control over growth and harvest, the use of their own labs and equipment (which Gary Young states are the only instruments in the world that are matched and calibrated to the instruments used at the National Center for Scientific Research in France), YL openly declares that their oils are “therapeutic” grade and no other oils but their own are fully safe to be used neat or internally.
There are a few essential oils that are generally recognized as safe to use undiluted. Of course, there has to be a few exceptions to the rule. Again, in Organic Body Care Recipes, the author points out that the only essential oils that are widely acknowledged as safe to use undiluted (sparingly) are: lavender, German chamomile, tea tree, sandalwood, and rose geranium.

I prefer Appalachian valley — they are a wholesale distributor as well but you can purchase small quantities from them as well. Use the code – roseotto and you can get their wholesale prices. If you purchase 5, 10, or 20ml bottles when you add them to the cart you will see a discount. I really love their products and got a sample of their frankincense – wow!! Love it.
Hi. Faith. Thanks for sharing about NOW essential oils. In the last two months, I have been learning about EOs and bought several NOW oils at GNC, with the initial intent of using them in more natural cleaning products, getting away from many that are chemical-based and hard to breathe when using. I cannot say that they have had any health benefits for me yet, as I am fortunate to not be prone to a lot of illness, but I have bought NOW grapeseed oil and have used lavender in it on my skin, and have used peppermint for headaches, but I am still learning. I did, however, just purchase the NOW diffuser, two actually, which just arrived this past Saturday afternoon, and I have been enjoying blending oils for scent.
The Mountain Rose Herbs essential oils actually come in a variety of price ranges. I’ve found some of them quite approachable, but certain oils are again on the expensive side. It depends which one(s) you’re looking for, so the best thing you can do is have a look at their website and shop for the oils you’d like. Keep in mind, this will all be certified organic that you’re purchasing, so the extra dollars spent may be worth the investment.
I’m newbie to EO. I’ve purchased Peppermint, Wild Orange, Lavender, Clove from Doterra to start with (quite pricey) and then I discovered a nice selection of EO in Marshalls (!). There i purchased Pine, Lemon and Eucalyptus from Plantlife ‘100 % pure aromatherapy grade’ at a fraction of the cost. Firstly, can you please explain the difference of quality with Doterra and Plantlife? And secondly, you say when rubbed onto the skin, the oils need to be diluted – but with what? And where do I find this? (Trader Joe’s perhaps?) What is the safest ‘dilution’ for someone in the journey of starting of a family? My acupuncturist made up a Doterra rollerball ‘Fertility blend’ with Cary Sage. Thanking you kindly.
I have had a beginer/intermediate training in aromatherapy and my teacher then and a current certified teaching aromatherapist I know now, do not reccomend ‘neat’ or undiluted applications unless the oil is high in linalol (a chemical you should be familar with if you’re versed enough to be giving classes) and only on small scrapes, occasionally. NEVER neat applications on a baby, many are not reccomened for babies or young kids at all. The only way it wouldn’t have given them a reaction is if they were diluted and or inferiorly distilled. If you had training in aromatherapy (an actual class w/ anatomy/physiology, chemistry, etc.) you would know that, as well as how dangerous ingestion of EO’s can be to the mucous membranes and not telling the uneducated to just ‘go ahead and drink it’ nor would the company you get them from if they were ethical. Honestly I know you’re not trying to harm anyone, but please get more education under your belt first (a certification would be best) before you do harm someone. This goes for anyone anywhere, remember we live in a sue happy culture!
A Clinical Aromatherapist IS a healthcare practitioner. They are trained in chemistry, anatomy, diagnostics, physiology, formulation guidelines and safety issues regarding each specific internal route (oral, vaginal or rectal). Taking them internally can have serious health effects if you don’t know what you are doing. Other countries have a culture of using EOs and therefore know how to use them appropriately and safely. We do not have that here. I’ve known several people who have listened to their Young Living or doTerra Reps and taken EOs internally and ended up with serious health problems.

We've covered a lot about aiding mood and mentality, but what about the more physical healing benefits of essential oils? Many plants are natural antiseptics, anti-inflammatories, antimicrobials, and antivirals, so when concentrated into essential oil form, they can function as highly effective remedies for acne, muscle soreness, sore throats, and more. Take ever-versatile peppermint oil, for example. "It's cooling, and can be found in formulated muscle care products along with eucalyptus, wintergreen, and German chamomile essential oils to name a few," Avery says. Try her go-to recipe for a DIY leg rub: "Add 10 drops of peppermint essential oil to one ounce of sweet almond oil, and rub it into leg muscles and feet."
I myself have a preference for a particular company because of my own personal results and the consistent reports of my clients. I am also passionate about quality due to the way I use oils. I do stick with what has worked for me and my clients consistently. However, when reporting the information on this blog, I try to keep the facts and put my experience and company suggestions in a separate section and on a different website clearly delineated.
Another ridiculous claim by people who understand basically nothing about chemistry. I am not sure I know of anything that will last even as long as the earth remains, with perhaps the exceptions of diamonds and human ignorance LOL. The truth is that while the oil may last in the sense that it "exists" for a long time, there is no question that most oils, pure or otherwise, will eventually go bad due to oxidation reactions that are unavoidable unless you could somehow store them in an oxygen free atmosphere (basically impossible for most people). Even if stored in an inert atmosphere there is still the possibility of some EO molecules reacting with themselves over long periods, changing the oil, many times for the worse.
Yes, of the 3 brands I am most comfortable using for therapeutic purposes the first is doTerra. Its testing exceeds everything else I’ve come across protecting against not just fillers and chemical extraction, but also against oxidation for potency levels. When air hits the oils for a period of time they oxidize slowly and if that happens they may be less quick and effective than if they had not had that time to oxidize. No other company tests the same number of times for this level of potency. I also love that the testing is done by a third party rather than in house testing.
NOTE: Much of the information in this column is derived from easily accessible books and websites, including Make an Informed Vaccine Decision for the Health of Your Child by Mayer Eisenstein, MD, JD, MPH; The Sanctity of Human Blood: Vaccination is Not Immunization, by Tim O’Shea,  DC; Screening Sandy Hook, Causes and Consequences by Deanna Spingola (an online e-book); the writings and lectures of Russell Blaylock, MD; Immunologist J. Barthelow Classen, MD; Harold E Buttram, MD, Dr Sherri Tenpenny, Dr Suzanne Humphries, Dr Kenneth Stoller, Dr Andrew Wakefield, Dr Mark Geier, and Dr Joseph Mercola, and the following two articles: http://www.vaccines.net/vaccine-induced-immune-overload.pdf. http://www.globalresearch.ca/vaccine-induced-immune-overload-and-the-epidemic-of-chronic-autoimmune-childhood-disease/5431013.
Balsam of Peru, an essential oil derived from the Myroxylon, is used in food and drink for flavoring, in perfumes and toiletries for fragrance, and in medicine and pharmaceutical items for healing properties.[33][unreliable source?] However, a number of national and international surveys have identified Balsam of Peru as being in the "top five" allergens most commonly causing patch test allergic reactions in people referred to dermatology clinics.[34][35][36]

We found that boswellic acids contents depended on hydrodistillation duration and temperature (Table? 2). Essential oils prepared from longer distillation time and higher distillation temperature contained greater amounts of boswellic acids. For example, boswellic acids contents in Fractions III (19.6%) and IV (30.1%) were higher than those detected in Fraction I (0.9%) or II (0.8%) essential oil.

Aromatherapy is a form of alternative medicine in which healing effects are ascribed to the aromatic compounds in essential oils and other plant extracts. Aromatherapy may be useful to induce relaxation, but there is not sufficient evidence that essential oils can effectively treat any condition.[23] Essential oils should not be interpreted to be cures for chronic disease, or other illnesses, as scientific research does not support this.[24] Much of the research on the use of essential oils for health purposes has serious methodological errors. In a systemic review of 201 published studies on essential oils as alternative medicines, only 10 were found to be of acceptable methodological quality, and even these 10 were still weak in reference to scientific standards.[25] Use of essential oils may cause harm including allergic reactions and skin irritation; there has been at least one case of death.[26] As such, the use of essential oils as an alternative medicine should be approached with caution.
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