Essential oils are wholly natural and cannot be patented; which means that you’ll never see an essential oil in a pharmaceutical drug. As such, you can expect that the vast majority of mainstream healthcare practitioners will never recommend essential oils as therapeutic alternatives to drugs. More importantly, because essential oils cannot be patented, drug companies will not waste money studying them. This limits our scientific knowledge of essential oils GREATLY, and the majority of what we know about them are things that have been passed down through thousands of years of personal use and experimentation.
“If you want to make a difference to people who are being fed a bunch a garbage by a narcissistic EO messiah…”, it makes me question whether the negative things you say about Young Living and the quality of their oils has any true basis, or if you have unresolved anger over your former relationship with Young Living which leads to your bashing the company and their products.
We stand behind the quality of our diffusers and will take back any unit that is no longer functional. Bring it into any location or connect with our Customer Experience team, and we will happily repair or exchange it — it’s our lifetime efficacy guarantee. In order to protect the environment and reduce waste, we do not accept returns on previously used functional units.

Hi. I have been buying my eos from a wholesaler called Bulk Apothecary at a very cheap price. They claim to be very pure and high quality, but the labels on products are pretty vague and I dont have much to compare the quality to, as I have never spent the extra money on more expensive ones. I cant. but I am a firm believer in using them, and am trying to build my collection. Do you know much about this company and their supply of eos? I would appreciate any feedback. Thank you.
Don’t overdo it though. Remember, these oils are extremely concentrated. Prolonged exposure to essential oils can cause ill effects like headaches, nausea or other unpleasant symptoms. Vary your use with different oils of different chemical compounds so that they don’t build up in your system. And avoid letting your diffuser run all day, every day; there is a such thing as too much of a good thing.
Dr. William Thompson (senior CDC scientist), who is  mentioned above as co-author of this study, blew the whistle and admitted that he was pressured to omit statistically significant data, and that there is a connection between this vaccine and autism. He released this statement in an official capacity, as explained by the Congressman in the video below. This story was an has been completely ignored by mainstream media.
Bergamot, another essential oil with "multitasking" capabilities, is often used as part of a treatment for depression because of its ability to reduce stress responses. When inserted into oil diffusers, it helped create a positive mood in patients. Besides its uplifting effect on mood, it can also be used as an antibacterial and antifungal agent against E. coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus.
Essential oils can be altered to achieve standardization (for example, a certain chemical that was found to be at a lower concentration in the whole oil in a particular year can be added to make it the same percentage as last year's batch). The problem with standardized essential oils is that they are no longer natural, genuine, and authentic. This variability in essential oils by time, place and conditions is a big challenge to conducting valid research. Currently the International Standards Organization sets standards for each essential oil that include a range of acceptable concentrations for its major chemical constituents.
One example of oil that shows some evidence of effectiveness is tea tree oil, which may be an effective treatment for acne, according to the NIH. In one clinical trial, researchers compared gel containing tea tree oil to a benzoyl peroxide product, and found that the benzoyl peroxide worked slightly better but that the tea tree oil had fewer side effects, according to the NIH.
When washing clothes I use regular soap (haven’t looked into home made yet), and then put about 2 tablespoons of Epsom salt scented with a few drops of essential oils into the bottom of the washer before adding clothes. Then instead of using fabric softner I fill the dispenser with regular white vinegar. It keeps the washer from getting that funky smell and my clothes come out way softer. At first I was worried you would be able to smell the vinegar, but I have been doing this for 6 months now and you really can’t smell it! The Epsom salt doesn’t really have to have essential oil in it, the scent seems to rinse out in the wash but I like the little burst of scent you get when you dump it in, and use fairly cheap oils like citrus for it. If you want your clothes to actually smell of the oils you can get some wool dryer balls and add an oil of your choice before drying.

In my ever growing quest to find the healthiest options in my life, I began to wonder what about my essential oils? It's true that with the help of essential oils (and a healthy GMO-free diet), my family hasn't actually been sick in about a year and a half. That is a LONG time!!!! Before essential oils entered the picture, I was constantly fighting off sinus infections, colds, the flu….you name it, and I was possibly experiencing it. Essential oils have become my go-to every time I have had something come up; from cleaning, to medical, to emotional, each time I have found success in my quest to keep my family healthy. Only now, am I asking, “What about my essential oils?”


There has never been a documented instance of an anti-body response (i.e. sensitization) to an essential oil. Essential oil antibodies have never been found or detected in anyone. Unless sensitization occurs and antibodies are produced and stored in the body, there can be no allergic reaction. Therefore, we can state unequivocally that essential oils are not and cannot be allergens. Sometimes people do have allergy-like reactions but these are no allergenic in nature. They are detox reactions.

The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? It’s important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by companies selling oils and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgments about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.
The Ananda Apothecary operates business hours of Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm MST. You can call 1-303-440-3766 for Customer Service or contact custserv@anandaapothecary.com. This brand also offers a newsletter, social media channels, and a neat “Aroma Science” section where you can learn a whole bunch of detailed essential oil information from their staff chemist (who is also their most active writer).
I assumed this was just standard competition stuff that we've seen before with other big brands in Corporate America. Then I read this article on LearningAboutEOs.com last summer that showed 'proof' from a third party lab that there were synthetic compounds found in several large and small essential oil companies. I highly recommend you read this in its entirety.

The potential danger of an essential oil is sometimes relative to its level or grade of purity, and sometimes related to the toxicity of specific chemical components of the oil. Many essential oils are designed exclusively for their aroma-therapeutic quality; these essential oils generally should not be applied directly to the skin in their undiluted or "neat" form. Some can cause severe irritation, provoke an allergic reaction and, over time, prove hepatotoxic.


"When you smell an essential oil," says Tony Ferrari, Ph.D. in chemistry, "its constituents bind to receptor sites in the nose, which read the aroma molecules and send signals through the olfactory nerve to the limbic system and amygdala in the brain. There are more than 5,000 chemical compounds that make up commonly used oils, each of which binds in a different way to different receptors, so their effects can vary widely."
Essential oils are usually lipophilic (literally: "oil-loving") compounds that usually are not miscible with water. They can be diluted in solvents like pure ethanol and polyethylene glycol. The most common way to safely dilute essential oils for topical use is in a carrier oil. This can be any vegetable oil readily available, the most popular for skin care being jojoba, coconut, wheat germ, olive and avocado.[32]
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