The most highly prized Lavender, Lavandula angustifolia, commonly called English Lavender, is also sometimes referred to as “True Lavender”. This unfortunately leads some to conclude that the other 38 Lavandula species are not real lavenders. That is false. All Lavandula species are real lavenders. Lavender 40/42 is 100% real Lavender oil, but it is not 100% Lavandula angustifolia. This may be dissatisfying to some natural perfumers, who can contend that only Lavandula angustifolia is suitable in perfumes as well as some aromatherapists who can contend that only Lavandula angustifolia is adequate for aromatherapy. I am also a purist in some ways, but I think the superiority of Lavandula angustifolia can be just slightly exaggeratted at times.
When working with children ALWAYS dilute the ois moderately to heavily. If it says 1:4 dilution meaning 1 drop of EO to 4 drops of carrier then you want to double or triple it for the child. Do your research – you can use most oils in children of all ages provided you dilute them properly. My DD had immunizations not too long ago and I used moderately diluted lavender, heavily diluted lemon, and heavily diluted peppermint to combat the fever she had and some Heavily diluted Panaway which is a YL blend to control the pain. They worked wonderfully and she was a happy camper by that evening. The next day which is typically the worst she was her normal self and you couldn’t tell that she had been given shots the day before.
In the world of essential oils there is an enormous amount of controversy and competition, with some companies accusing other companies of being less pure, while others claim trademarks and exclusivity on their products. All of this noise creates plenty of confusion for the average consumer to sift through, especially since there is no official regulation or oversight on the essential oil industry, federal or otherwise.
The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? It’s important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by companies selling oils and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgments about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.

Also, if you drink it, you should only use a glass or stainless steel container. Glass is highly preferred over the two and the easiest for cleaning out of the previous EO. The smell/taste of an EO tends to “linger” a bit. This is usually a good thing I would think in say aromatherapy but in this case not so much…unless of course you prefer to use the same EO each time.


The essential oils industry is not regulated by the FDA, making comparison shopping quite difficult. Some essential oil brands use certain terminologies, others use different names for the same thing. A huge question lately is whether or not you can safely ingest essential oils. Some brands advertise internal use of essential oils, and others advise against it. I recommend to spend some time and get to know an essential oils brand first before you get their products through your door and trust them with the well-being of yourself and your family.
So, as you can see, it would be impossible to characterize an essential oil or even a single essential oil molecule as having a single vibrational energy frequency. Furthermore, the energy of vibration in molecules is way higher than the 52 Mhz – 320 MHz (52,000,000 – 320,000,000 Hertz) range claimed by the people selling the eo frequency measuring devices. In fact, that low energy range would be in the radio waves region and below.

Dermal sensitization is a type of allergic reaction. It occurs on first exposure to a substance, but on this occasion, the noticeable effect on the skin will be slight or absent. However, subsequent exposure to the same material, or to a similar one with which there is cross-sensitization, produces a severe inflammatory reaction brought about by cells of the immune system (T-lymphocytes).7 The reaction will be represented on the skin as blotchy or redness, which may be painful to some individuals.
Plants, like other living things, need to protect themselves from various types of predators. Plants use terpenoid compounds to deter insects and other animals from approaching them. Shawe pointed out that “insects are very rarely found on peppermint plants and the presence of linalol in the peel of citrus fruits confers resistance to attack by the Caribbean fruit fly.” 5 The Douglas fir tree releases a complex mixture of volatile oils, or terpenes, from their needles to defend against the spruce budworm. Even more fascinating is that the Douglas fir trees “will vary the composition and production of terpenes each year thus decreasing the ability of the budworm to develop widespread immunity to specific compounds.6
Plant Therapy’s labels are a bit scarce in their information. They display the proper Latin names and the USDA Organic logo, but that’s it. Instead of including the country of origin and other important notes — which can be found on the website — they have a long description of what the oils could be used for and how to use it, followed by an FDA disclaimer so they won’t get in trouble.
Because of the vast differences in the chemistry of the whole herb versus just the essential oil portion of a plant, one should NEVER take the properties of the herb and assume that the essential oil will have the same properties. This would literally be like saying “A nice juicy steak from a cow has a lot of great protein, but I don’t like meat so I am just going to collect the sweat from the cow and drink that to get all the protein I need.” Of course sweat does not contain any significant amount of protein, as it is mainly water, so this would be a preposterous notion. Obviously the real protein, the most useful stuff to our bodies, is in the meat of the cow. This does not mean that there can’t be some overlap between the essential oil and herbal medicine, we all know that smelling fresh lavender flowers can have a relaxing effect, just as the essential oil has a relaxing effect, this is because the lavender flower contains the essential oil and it’s the essential oil that you are smelling when you smell the flower. But I promise you, and please don't try this at home, you will have an entirely different experience if you eat 5 grams of lavender flower versus drinking 5 grams of lavender essential oil. In fact, the latter would not be a good idea at all!
Recently, there was an article from Vanderbuilt Medical Center stating that the Tennessee Poison Center reported a doubling of children and essential oils exposure in recent years. The article did not state an increase in hospitalizations or side effects. Furthermore, I couldn’t find a source for actual numbers. (The full original article can be found here). Therefore, as soon as I read the press release and did my unsuccessful search, I contacted the reporter.

Initially and up to this day, the necessity of testing is that most worldwide production of essential oils is for flavor and fragrance materials. The essential oil/fragrance industry has a long tradition of altering essential oils in the form of “standardization” and/or “extending” them. Purity is a problem with many big producers and distributors. Even the smaller essential oil producers and distributors are found to have quality problems too. Very few aromatherapy companies know what is in their oils because no one in the supply chain is analyzing their oils or in some cases outright doctoring their results. There are practical considerations; analysis is expensive, complex and takes years of experience.
I highly recommend it. If you will take the time to read his information, he clearly shows that many of the “leading” EO companies utilize deceptive marketing to push impure or adulterated EO’s for therapeutic use. He also gives (and references) many non-standard use instructions as well as use in conjunction with herbs. Very good info even if you choose not to purchase EO’s from the site.
I use Young Living Essential Oils. They are the most pure and best for anyone. Most articles say not to ingest them (that means that something hidden has been added). I would steer clear of those companies. Young Living can be ingested. I am motivated to use them because they do work. go to Young Living website and check it out. If you are interested in signing up, contact me. Signing up means buying at 24% discount. You are able to earn free products. Other oil companies are less expensive, that is because the process of producing it means cutting corners. I want the most pure. I will pay extra for the best.
In the follow up email that I received, it stated that they have never found any adulteration in their oils, that perhaps a compound of the oil was misidentified, and that they couldn't contact the lab that had done the testing and shown adulteration because they are located in France. I know they speak French in France, but they do have phones and email.
All pure essential oils have therapeutic qualities..Just because an essential oil states Do Not Consume,or does NOT state pure therapeutic grade oils does not mean it is not a 100% pure essential oil. I am in Australia and we are not by law allowed to state that essential oils can be taken orally as the above mentioned companies do.That does not make the oils I use any lesser quality than the above mentioned oils.I am a small company and to have every oil I use tested to be able to state that they are therapeutic grade oils is a large expense when anyone with an ounce of common sense knows that all essential oils have therapeutic qualities. In saying this I know that there is possibly companies that do dilute there oils and do not do the right thing so it is up to consumers to know to deal with a reputable company. These American companies mentioned by Holly sell their EOs to individuals but also by pyramid selling from what I have been told . As for Organic…you may have a farm that states they are organic, but if the farm down the road is not organic and sprays their crops…well HELLO you cannot tell me that spray does not get blown in the wind
RC and Raven (YL Blends) are a few that I have used for myself and family for breathing issues. And Digize (also a Young Living Blend) is excellent for digestion, acid, and upset. Peppermint and Fennel are also options to look into. As far as best brand, you will have to do your research. I have been very happy with Young Living, but I know many will find the “best” from various sources to make up their essential oil cabinet. You will not want to use a vaporizer for your oils, I would suggest purchasing a diffuser which is designed to disperse your oils, over time essential oils will breakdown plastic tubing. A search on Amazon or Abundanthealth.com is a place to start looking at diffusers. You can also get a free one in premium kits sold by Young Living. Please feel free to contact me.
Many essential oils affect the skin and mucous membranes in ways that are valuable or harmful. Many essential oils, particularly tea tree oil, may cause contact dermatitis.[19][20][21][22] They are used in antiseptics and liniments in particular. Typically, they produce rubefacient irritation at first and then counterirritant numbness. Turpentine oil and camphor are two typical examples of oils that cause such effects. Menthol and some others produce a feeling of cold followed by a sense of burning. This is caused by its effect on heat-sensing nerve endings. Some essential oils, such as clove oil or eugenol, were popular for many hundred years in dentistry as antiseptics and local anesthetics.
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