In the world of essential oils there is an enormous amount of controversy and competition, with some companies accusing other companies of being less pure, while others claim trademarks and exclusivity on their products. All of this noise creates plenty of confusion for the average consumer to sift through, especially since there is no official regulation or oversight on the essential oil industry, federal or otherwise.
It depends! Most students earn their certification within 6 months to a year, but the program is completely self-paced, which means you can slow it down or move through it more quickly, depending on your learning style and availability. You’ll have permanent unlimited access to your course materials and the Aromahead online forum – as well as any subsequent updates to the course content – even after you’ve completed the program.
I’m a newbie to essential oils. My daughter-in-law became a consultant for YL oils in the fall. I’m just now researching essential oils and noticed a huge difference in YL oils and others I’ve found online. My question is how do I know when cheaper is just as good, cheaper is the same quality or you get what you pay for, cheap equals cheap quality. Also what is a good carrier for rubbing oils? Thank you for your help.
I realize that it’s been a while since you posted this question, but hope this information helps anyway. My poor husband had the same problem with leg cramps. Took supplements for potassium and ate bananas and oranges like crazy. No difference. Heard then that the deficiency that causes these cramps is more likely related to magnesium, so he started taking a magnesium supplement. Still no difference.
I first began studying aromatherapy in the 90s. Thankfully, I never got caught up with particular MLM companies that make marketing claims and promote practices that I find concerning and unsafe. I was avoiding these companies for other reasons and did not realize until I had inquired with NAHA's president at the time, Kelly Holland Azzaro, that the term "therapeutic grade" was apparently coined by one MLM in particular.
Dr Mike Patrick is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Ohio State University College of Medicine and Medical Director of Interactive Media for Nationwide Children's Hospital. Since 2006, he has hosted the award-winning PediaCast, a pediatric podcast for parents. Dr Mike also produces a national podcast for healthcare providers—PediaCast CME, which explores general pediatric and faculty development topics and offers free AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ to listeners.

Essential oils can have complex biochemical interactions in the human body, she says—and different essential oils can create different reactions in our enzymes and hormones. One of the active ingredients in tea tree oil, for example, is Terpinen-4-ol, which was shown in studies to kill ectoparasites found on human skin and kill infectious amoebas that cause eye infections.
you said eo’s should not be taken internally, yet I have been using doterra’s GX Assist for my 33 year old handicapped daughter who has a lot of trouble with yeast and bacteria and GI problems ( all typical of her handicap which is 22q13 deletion syndrome) I’m only giving her one capsule a day and even though it’s a 10 day course I may continue with this for a while as I am seeing a calmer happier person that meds just haven’t been able to achieve…any advise? I am new to eo’s and want to learn all I can and use them wisely as I suspect I have found something much better for her than all the stuff that has been prescribed by her good doctors over the years.
The pharmacist have the possibility to vote the “best pharmacy partner” within the “OTC-Studie” every year. Gold, silver and bronce medals are distributed in 52 categories. The “OTC-Studie” of the “PharmaRundschau” analyse which products or product families the pharmacies recommend the most to their customers from chosen OTC-indication groups. The reputation of a company and the business policy is for industry, wholesaler and service partner important in the eyes of pharmacies. That’s why the question after the company the pharmacies work best with and would recommend is an indicator for satisfaction of the customers with their market partner.
Essential oils aren’t really oils in the true sense of the word. They are complex mixtures of aromatic compounds extracted from plant material. They have distinct odors, poor solubility in water (a trait they share with true oils), and are extracted from plants by distillation and cold pressing. Common examples include lavender, peppermint, tea tree and eucalyptus, but you’ll find hundreds more.
The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? It’s important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by companies selling oils and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgments about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.
I personally do not believe EVERYTHING written by companies regarding their products. I research, and sometimes try things out myself, for the truth. I too, have heard and read online the issues regarding YL and doTerra products. As others have mentioned, YL founder has been through the legal system regarding the claims of his products. ( At the same time, our government does not seem to be happy that many are finding alternatives to modern medicine, and would rather everyone was on drugs… so). And that doTerra was started by three former employees of YL.

Lavender 40/42 is a blend of Lavenders consisting of Lavandula angustifolia (English Lavender), Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin Grosso), Lavandula latifolia (Spike Lavender), Lavandula stoechas (Topped Lavender), etc. The producer of Lavender 40/42 will select oils distilled from these various Lavender species, blending them together to produce an oil that both meets the 40/42 standard, as well as one that economical, which is the other attraction of Lavender 40/42. As lovers of Lavender know, the cost of Lavender oil can run very high some years. If the harvest of Lavandula angustifolia in Bulgaria or France is 25% less than expected, the price skyrockets, driving up everyone’s costs and eating into all of our profits. Selective blending of these various Lavender species allows for the production of Lavender oil with a cost less affected by an unpredictable fluctuating market.
An essential oil is a concentrated hydrophobic liquid containing volatile (defined as "the tendency of a substance to vaporize") aroma compounds from plants. Essential oils are also known as volatile oils, ethereal oils, aetherolea, or simply as the oil of the plant from which they were extracted, such as oil of clove. An essential oil is "essential" in the sense that it contains the "essence of" the plant's fragrance—the characteristic fragrance of the plant from which it is derived.[1] The term essential used here does not mean indispensable as with the terms essential amino acid or essential fatty acid which are so called since they are nutritionally required by a given living organism.[2] In contrast to fatty oils, essential oils typically evaporate completely without leaving a stain or residue.
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