You seem to be a bit touchy about research. I would suggest that you go to PubMed and search for “essential oils.” You will definitely find some scholarly research that has been published on the subject….but not nearly enough. (If you need a comparison, do a search for your favorite pharmaceutical drug). Given that publications are the currency for academic research, this would suggest that there aren’t as many researchers studying these essential oils as you seem to think.

At NOW® we’ve established long-standing relations with our essential oil vendors, and we purchase our oils in large quantities that qualify for bulk discounts, which we then pass on to consumers in the form of everyday low pricing. We also sell direct to retailers instead of going through distributors, which can add as much as 30% to a product’s cost.
In the United States, aromatherapy is regulated by how it is intended for use: cosmetic, drug, fragrance, food additive for consumption, or “something else.” Therefore, if a claim is made by any natural substance or an essential oil that makes it appear as a drug, and it hasn’t gone through the FDA approval process for this, the claim is in violation of the drug standards. (This does not imply that the oil itself is unsafe, rather, that the proper protocol for approval was not adhered to.)
I did purchase this item from Amazon. It was delivered on September 11th. For some reason, the button to write a review is not there, but I feel that I must do so anyway because I dislike this product that much. No issues with anything but the smell. It smells terrible. I mean TERRIBLE. I've been using vetiver in my essential oil calming spray formula for about 8 months now. The brand that I usually buy was out of stock and I really needed the oil, so I decided to try this one. It smells like old lady perfume (no offense to old ladies). Really, really strong old lady perfume. My house still stinks from the batch I made yesterday. I can't believe how different this smells from my regular brand. And it's not the "every batch/kind is different" reason either. Every single batch I've received from the other manufacturer has smelled the same. The smell of this product is not right at all. Do what you will with this information. I just felt the need to share my opinion. Thanks.

Essential oils are not really oils. They do not contain the fatty acids that constitute what we would consider an actual oil. Valerie Gennari Cooksley, author of Aromatherapy: Soothing Remedies to Restore, Rejuvenate and Heal defines essential oils as “highly concentrated plant constituents possessing potent medicinal and cosmetic qualities.” However, I think Stephanie Tourles nailed it in Organic Body Care recipes when she said, “I consider essential oils the life force or the soul of the plant.”
Thank yo so much for crating such a FINE description of how to approach/evaluate/use essential oils! Nicely done! I have been studying essential oils as a soul-level healing modality for about 5 years. I’m never without a sense of awe and wonder regarding the power of the plant at it’s essence…it’s oil. I will take baths with epsom salt and essential oils. The best way to do that is to put the epsom salt in a cup, add your drops of essential oil, let it sit for a few minutes, then dump it in your bath water. The salt helps to capture and diffuse the oil so that it doesn’t sit on the water like an oil slick. The hot water can also help to express the scent in a powerful way, so use your drops sparingly if you aren’t wanting to be overwhelmed by the scent. With genuine, highly crafted essential oils, the homeopathic rule of less is more powerful is the way to go, in my opinion and experience.
Secondly, if we look at the structure of sclareol shown below we will see that it actually has very little in common with the structure of any of the estrogen molecules, E2 being the one that it would have the most in common with because both are what we would call “diols” meaning there are two alcohol groups. Sclareol is not a steroid but what would have to be termed a diterpene diol, not even remotely close to the necessary steroidal backbone.
First, their bottles didn’t come with the little plastic dripper caps that cover the mouth of the bottle (aka. orifice reducer), they just had a simple screw cap. Without the orifice reducers you either have to pour the oil out and make a mess or dip an eye dropper into the oil which can potentially contaminate the product if you’re not careful. Plus if oil gets into the little rubber bulb of the eye dropper it can get stuck in there and go bad, further contaminating the oil.
The best carrier oils for essential oils Carrier oils are used to dilute essential oils so that they do not irritate the skin of those who use them. There are many different plant-based oils that people can use, including coconut, rosehip, and jojoba oils. In this article, we look at several options and how they can be combined with essential oils. Read now

you said eo’s should not be taken internally, yet I have been using doterra’s GX Assist for my 33 year old handicapped daughter who has a lot of trouble with yeast and bacteria and GI problems ( all typical of her handicap which is 22q13 deletion syndrome) I’m only giving her one capsule a day and even though it’s a 10 day course I may continue with this for a while as I am seeing a calmer happier person that meds just haven’t been able to achieve…any advise? I am new to eo’s and want to learn all I can and use them wisely as I suspect I have found something much better for her than all the stuff that has been prescribed by her good doctors over the years.
More importantly, the founders and owners of the companies will have personal relationships with the farmers so they can be certain of what they are getting. There are many tiny, locally operated farms around the world who can’t afford the extremely high costs of organic certification, yet they still practice organic farming which includes: no use of chemical pesticides, herbicides or fertilizers, no genetically modified seeds, and healthy crop rotation to protect the soils. That is what is meant by Unsprayed.
48 detailed datasheets for the Essential Oils studied in the course. Aromahead's printer-friendly datasheets clearly lay out all the most important information you might need on hand for easy reference – including each oil's: therapeutic properties, emotional and energetic properties, safety data, chemical profile, Latin name, botanical family, plant part, plant origin, practical clinical applications, aroma, note, and extraction method.

An essential oil is a concentrated hydrophobic liquid containing volatile (defined as "the tendency of a substance to vaporize") aroma compounds from plants. Essential oils are also known as volatile oils, ethereal oils, aetherolea, or simply as the oil of the plant from which they were extracted, such as oil of clove. An essential oil is "essential" in the sense that it contains the "essence of" the plant's fragrance—the characteristic fragrance of the plant from which it is derived.[1] The term essential used here does not mean indispensable as with the terms essential amino acid or essential fatty acid which are so called since they are nutritionally required by a given living organism.[2] In contrast to fatty oils, essential oils typically evaporate completely without leaving a stain or residue.

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