I’m not hear to debate semantics on the exact meanings behind doTERRA’s CPTG rating on their oils. Weather it’s a “trademark” or “certification” in the legal sense does not concern me. What I learned is that the tests are being done and they are extensive. Because of that the company can then give you their promise that they are what they say. There really are extensive test, and they are being done by companies other than doTERRA. I trust the oils because of this and the miraculous results I’ve experienced with them. I DO NOT claim that these are the only pure oils on the market. I believe what I’m reading from other bloggers who stand behind oils that give them amazing results. I think that’s wonderful and I for one hope the market for pure oils will continue to grow. I’ve found that things progress much better when “we all get along”. Working together for the highest, healthiest, outcomes is always going to go a lot further than wasting time on hostilities. The oils on the market that are not pure will eventually weed themselves out among those who use EO’s because they simply do not supply the needed results. For those of you who are new at EO’s, take the time to find ones that work, because the good ones DO work wonders. I prefer to talk about amazing, positive progress in natural health care. I do no care to argue about things that have many issues that have many sides that we may have only partial information about. Natural selection will take care of most of the problems. I will not get caught up in the blogging hostilities that pit this company against that company. I want to spend my time on the positive.
One unpleasant—but totally effective—parallel you’d find in nature is poison ivy: We react to poison ivy with those awful, itchy-as-all-get-out red bumps because we’re exposed to an active compound in the plant that interacts with our skin. Elizabeth Trattner, M.D., explains that essential oils work differently—but they’re even stronger. "Essential oils can be up to 100 times more potent than the plant itself," she says. "So their effects are visible with just a few drops."
Use the tips within AromaWeb's How to Buy Essential Oils article to guide you on what to look for when considering suppliers. Companies that use the terms "therapeutic grade" and "aromatherapy grade" may simply be trying to quickly convey to you that their oils were carefully chosen and tested for use by those practicing holistic aromatherapy. Some companies still have no idea that these terms are confusing.
The oils are steam-distilled or mechanically pressed from flowers, trees, shrubs, fruit, roots, rinds, resins and herbs. Each plant's essential oil has a different chemical composition that affects how it smells, how it is absorbed, and how it is used by the body. Even the essential oils from different varieties of the same species may have different chemical compositions, and can vary when the same plants are grown or harvested in different ways, or in different locations.
I highly recommend it. If you will take the time to read his information, he clearly shows that many of the “leading” EO companies utilize deceptive marketing to push impure or adulterated EO’s for therapeutic use. He also gives (and references) many non-standard use instructions as well as use in conjunction with herbs. Very good info even if you choose not to purchase EO’s from the site.

Wondering how those great smelling essential oils are made? Turns out, essential oils aren’t “made” at all. They ARE “extracted” from plants, herbs and spices. But just because they are extracted from plants doesn’t mean the way they’re sourced is all the same. In fact, the way they’re extracted from the plant or herb can have a big impact on the quality. Here’s a quick rundown of the two primary ways essential oils are extracted from the plants.
Aura Cacia essential oils are packaged in amber glass bottles, which ensures that light does not disrupt the oils’ integrity and individual properties. The essential oil products are also 100% pure, not containing any additional bases, fillers, or additives. While not all of their oils are certified organic, they do have some certified organic oils in their line-up. If organic is important to you, shop for those specific product and look out for the correct “certified organic” label.

I learned a lot scanning the Blog about EO’s. Was considering gathering 3-4 I use a lot and sharing with the family as Xmas gifts. The Blog site really helped – especially Crubchy Betty’s list of 21 essential bits of info.I have only bought at GNC (ugh) but nice to have more options as fas as quality and price. I use peppermint EO just a drop iunder my nose at night to open up my sinuses and it works great! The peppermint is also helpful on temporals and behind the ears for sea sickness! And when I can’t sleep, the lavendar works wonders. Ginger is also a powerful anti-nausea EO for me.
MODIFICATIONS. Company may, in its sole discretion and without prior notice, (a) revise this Agreement; (b) revise the labelling or modify the ingredients or formula of any Products; and (c) discontinue the Website or any Products at any time.  Company shall post any revision to this Agreement to the Website, and the revision shall be effective immediately on such posting. You agree to review this Agreement and other online policies posted on the Website periodically to be aware of any revisions. You agree that, by continuing to use or access the Website following notice of any revision, you shall abide by any such revision.
In answer to your daughters eczema problem, I am a first time mother of an 8 month old. I just took her to an herbalist because I thought she had a rash and he told me it was eczema. She started out with it on her leg and within a couple weeks in spread all over her torso. He suggested I start giving her “Kali sulph” It is a homeopathic remedy used for various skin conditions. He recommended I give her two tablets three times per day. That was two weeks ago and there has been a significant change in her eczema! I do not know much about essential oils though I full heartedly believe they work but I am just a mom wanting to help another mom. I hope you find something for your daughter.
I am adding cinnamon leaf and clover EOs to my mouthwash with peppermint and tea tree EOs. Before I felt safe using the undiluted EOs but with these new additions I feel like I need carrier. The other ingredients are water, aloe water, baking soda, xylitol and witch hazel. Should I add a carrier oil and which one do you recommend? I was thinking avocado, sesame, grapeseed or olive oil. If the witch hazel has alcohol could this act as a carrier? How much alcohol per how many drops? I’ve heard its about 3-5 drops per teaspoon carrier oil (3-5%). Great post!
Which brings me to Young Loving. Sigh. I really LOVE their oils. They have a clarity that I just don’t find, reliably, from any other company that I have tried. I did the whole kit and membership thing but only for my own needs. I’m not here to sell anybody anything. I use a lot of their other products as well and have been happy with my purchases (except for the Rose Ointment that has Patchouli in it. I hate Patchouli).
When washing clothes I use regular soap (haven’t looked into home made yet), and then put about 2 tablespoons of Epsom salt scented with a few drops of essential oils into the bottom of the washer before adding clothes. Then instead of using fabric softner I fill the dispenser with regular white vinegar. It keeps the washer from getting that funky smell and my clothes come out way softer. At first I was worried you would be able to smell the vinegar, but I have been doing this for 6 months now and you really can’t smell it! The Epsom salt doesn’t really have to have essential oil in it, the scent seems to rinse out in the wash but I like the little burst of scent you get when you dump it in, and use fairly cheap oils like citrus for it. If you want your clothes to actually smell of the oils you can get some wool dryer balls and add an oil of your choice before drying.
The following properly diluted essential oils appear to be safe for use during pregnancy: benzoin, bergamot, black pepper, chamomile (German & Roman), clary sage, cypress, eucalyptus, frankincense, geranium, ginger, grapefruit, juniper, lavender, lemon, mandarin, majoram (sweet), neroli, petitgrain, rose, sandalwood, orange (sweet), tea tree, ylang ylang. 

I’ve used YL and DōTERRA and a few other unheard of brands of essential oils and you have got to check out Ameo Essential oils! It’s a brand new company and I’ve been very impressed with the quality of their oils. Another neat thing they do is show results of the testing of every batch of their oils to prove that they are the same high quality, pure, clinical standard oil as used in research and testing. The scientific research is just amazing with these oils.


You may be asking yourself, “so, which brand would you recommend I buy, Christina?” and that would be the same question that I was asking myself.  With all of these brands telling me that theirs was the best, I wasn't sure which brand to pick. I had been using Now Foods essential oils and Aura Casia for quite awhile and was seeing success with these brands. I was curious if these more affordable essential oils are working so well, how much better would the “high-end therapeutic grade” essential oils perform?
We have used Frontier/AuraCacia, MountainRose, RockyMountain, PlantTberaly and are happy with each of them. However, we’ve found Edens Gardens to work well for us. We love their blends, their sales/specials pricing and their customer service. We occasionally use the other brands (especially in a pinch) and sometimes place a order for AuraCacia through our Frontier Co-OP account.
There are always a few bad seeds to a group. Its is not the fault of the company that some people out there are giving false info or claiming an oil to be a cure all in the name of making a buck. These 2 companies have been and are actively talking steps to prevent this from happening further. I find it unfair to point the finger at the company when its individuals who have made bad choices. I use EO and when asked I will share what has worked for me, and I always tell people to do their own research.
The world of essential oils is vast, intriguing, and honestly, a tad confusing. Are these plant extracts actually that powerful? (Yes.) Do I need to be the DIY-loving, crunchy type to use and enjoy them? (Not at all!) Can I just dab a few drops on my skin and call it a day? (Nope—please don't.) What the heck do I use all these different scents for? (We'll tell you!)
Think about this for a moment – the aromatherapy industry is not the only user of essential oils. In fact, aromatherapy accounts for a very small percentage. The majority of essential oils produced end up in food flavouring, pharmaceutical, perfumery and personal care and these essential oils are usually modified to meet the standards required for each of these industries.
Much of this statement is quite misleading and not very well researched. There are a few marketers of EO that have actual farms where the plants are grown and harvested…some may even distil their own oils. There is only one producer of EO that controls the entire process from beginning to market. There is one large co. that claims to be pure and has been proven in court to have been making false statements and claims of purity. There are several companies that own no land and only a building where they do the paperwork and perhaps receive and reship their products because they source it all from someone else.
No, at least they shouldn’t have any preservatives. Think of essential oils like the essence of a plant or flower. To have them last they should come in a colored bottle (brown or blue) and be stored out of sunlight. You only use a small bit so that balances the cost. Keep the lids on the bottles and they’ll be fine. Nothing lasts forever (well, I take that back. Honey may just last forever).
I’ve enjoyed reading this site. There is a lot of good information and banter (though some isn’t so friendly, chill guys). I myself have only been using EO’s for a little under two years. Yes, they have changed my life and for the first time I feel empowered and able to be in charge of my own health care. I am healthier now than I’ve been in a very long time. I’m one of those persons who will take the time to check things out. My daughter told me about EO’s and a fairly new company, doTERRA. I wanted to believe all the wonderful things she was telling me, but not without checking out the company and putting the products to the test. At a lot of expense for me I did some investigating. So far I’ve found the company to be sound and based on ethical principles. I checked into the CTPG cirtification and found it to be sound also. Though the company pays for these extensive tests, they themselves do not perform them. It is third party and I believe available for other companies. With how extensive these tests are it may not be cost prohibative for many companies, however. I hope that others will follow suit eventually cause I know there are many very good EO companines out there. I do believe in EO’s now as I’ve had remarkable results for many health concerns and haven’t had to go to the doctor since I’ve been using them. I’m glad there is a standard finally set up (you guys should check out testing, it’s remarkable)that insures complete purity so that I may feel safe using these oils in a variety of ways, including internally. And yes, they are safe in their PUREST form for internal use. Other companies that follow suit will just give me more choices and give doTERRA healthy competition. HEALTHY competition is a good thing in my book. These oils are starting to ease their way into western medicine. The coming together of a variety of health care choices is what’s needed in this country, and it’s about time. Keep up the good work everyone in taking charge of your own health and the health of your families. Let’s hear it for the family!!!!
The truth is that as long as you are mixing each oil in the EXACT same percentage in each trial, the order of blending each component would almost never reveal a significant effect. When people do claim to notice differences in blends based on order of component addition, its typically because they do not have the ability to conduct the experiment with quantitative accuracy. For example, it would not be a scientific experiment to do various blends using drops of essential oil from orifice reducer bottles or even by counting drops from a pipette. The reason being that drops are often drastically inconsistent, even when using the same oil with the same dropper. The only way to accurately put together the blends is to use a digital scale, I recommend one that can weigh out to at least 0.001 gram. If all the components are added to blend in the exactly the same amount each time the blend is made and the components mixed thoroughly then the odor and chemistry should be identical each time, regardless of order they were added to the blend.
"Essential oils are incredibly concentrated and should always be used exactly as recommended," said Elizabeth Bloom, homeopath and founder of Elizabeth Essentials. "They are far more potent than dried herbs - approximately 75 to 100 times more concentrated. A large volume of plant material is needed to produce small amounts of a distilled oil - 220 pounds of lavender flowers, for example, is required to make 1 pound of lavender essential oil."

No, we advise against it. Skin irritation is possible with some essential oils, including Cassia or Cinnamon. Though many people do use our oils in a variety of ways, due to the powerful nature of steam distilled pure essential oils we label these products with cautions and suggest that you follow them and, as needed, consult an aromatherapist or health professional for proper use. There are also many good reference books on using essential oils safely.


An essential oil that exhibits this quality will cause burning or skin pigmentation changes, such as tanning, on exposure to sun or similar light (ultraviolet rays). Reactions can range from a mild color change through to deep weeping burns. Do not use or recommend the use of photosensitizing essential oils prior to going into a sun tanning booth or the sun. Recommend that the client stay out of the sun or sun tanning booth for at least twenty-four hours after treatment if photosensitizing essential oils were applied to the skin. Certain drugs, such as tetracycline, increase the photosensitivity of the skin, thus increasing the harmful effects of photosensitizing essential oils under the necessary conditions. Table 3 lists some common essential oils considered to be photosensitizers.
Hi Dave, So sorry to hear about the medical issues your family is facing. There is quite a bit written about using essential oils for cancer though I don’t have the info at my finger tips. I would be happy to see if I can find more info on where to direct you if you haven’t already found it. If you have an email or Facebook or some other way to be reached it might be a better way to converse. But either way one place you can go to get some ideas about other peoples experiences with various oils is oil-testimonials.com you can sign up for the free membership and then do searches on whatever you would like.”leukemia” “child leukemia” “Crohns” etc. It was formed for people using YL oils to share so some of the blends mentioned will be YL but it doesn’t mean you have to use YL to get the results. High quality oils are high quality oils, that said quality is so important especially when talking about treating something as major as the things you are and in my experience YL does produce high quality oils. I myself have treated Tertiary Chronic Lyme and having used both traditional antibiotics (IV, pills, suspension and sometimes all at the same time) and essential oils and can attest to the oils working as well as any other protocol I have been on without the side effects…well you probably see where I’m going. That doesn’t mean Young Living is the only company producing oils of that quality, they aren’t, nor does it mean I’m advocating the MLM approach, signing up was worth while for me to receive the discount since I order so many oils and I will sometimes order for other people at my discount but I have never pursued the business end of it. I also have and do use other companies oils and think investigating and having several sources is wise for various reasons. Anyway, sorry to go on so much your situation just struck a nerve. Feel free to contact me if you would like.
All companies and marketing aside, how do YOU most effectively use essential oils and do you have a resource to recommend that gives good guidelines to the beginner (i.e. which oils can be used topically and internally, and recommended dilutions, etc.) I have heard of a big reference book called The Complete Book of Essential Oils to be good–are you familiar with this title?
No, it’s not true that “other” essential oils are harmful, and should not be used internally or externally! Has someone told you that there is something impure about certified organic essential oils? Both Young Living and Do Terra buy many of their essential oils from the same industry suppliers that some of the companies listed above buy from. How do I know? Because I have been in the industry since 1974, and suppliers talk. And anyway, there are only so many producers of certain oils.

Estrogenic and antiandrogenic activity have been reported by in vitro study of tea tree oil and lavender essential oils. Two published sets of case reports suggest the lavender oil may be implicated in some cases of gynecomastia, an abnormal breast tissue growth in prepubescent boys.[44][45] The European Commission's Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety dismissed the claims against tea tree oil as implausible, but did not comment on lavender oil.[46] In 2018, a BBC report on a study stated that tea tree and lavender oils contain eight substances that when tested in tissue culture experiments, increasing the level of estrogen and decreasing the level of testosterone. Some of the substances are found in "at least 65 other essential oils". The study did not include animal or human testing.[47]

×