It depends! Most students earn their certification within 6 months to a year, but the program is completely self-paced, which means you can slow it down or move through it more quickly, depending on your learning style and availability. You’ll have permanent unlimited access to your course materials and the Aromahead online forum – as well as any subsequent updates to the course content – even after you’ve completed the program.
Hi there! I love your blog! I’m trying to find some information about using essential oils in homemade remineralizing toothpaste. My two year old uses this toothpaste and I’ve been adding the OraWellness Brushing Blend (a mix of several EOs in a base of sweet almond oil) to it. I was interested in also adding orange oil for flavor so I tried googling its safety for children. There’s so much conflicting advice about ingesting EOs and he does swallow the toothpaste almost every time. :/ Thoughts

The medicinal use of therapeutic essential oils can be very helpful and may support the body to bring rapid and welcome relief from a great variety of symptoms. However, the medicinal use of essential oils provides only a part of the many unique and powerful benefits of these complex plant essences. Therefore, the medicinal use of essential oils is best used as part of a larger, more holistic context of health and wellness, which can include mainstream medicine.
This actually dates from May 2010, but judging from the related comments, has only recently been noticed. The statement that “Clary sage is the essential oil that is most widely used to treat vision problems” is not true, since there are no essential oils commonly used to treat vision problems. The only evidence for any essential oil treating any eye problem relates to tea tree oil and eyelash mites (see below). The reference to clary sage probably derives from 17th century European herbalists, but this refers to using clary sage seeds, or mucilage made from them, and not to clary sage essential oil: “The seed put into the eyes clears them from motes and such like things gotten within the lids to offend them, and it also clears them from any white and red spots which may be on them” (Culpeper 1652). Another common name for clary sage (Salvia sclarea) was “clear eye” because of this common use of the seeds, which probably pre-dated Culpeper by many years. “Clary” may derive from “clear-eye.”
Holly is correct on the words! One of the best ways to tell if oils are safe and pure is if the common bottles do have “do not consume” or a similar statement on them! I don’t care what the distributor or customer care person says! I have tried over 10 of the top companies oils and all but one has said do not consume. That is a key for you to know the purity. I am allergic to petrochemicals so many I find have them in them! Many of the other dry out the back of many hand. Pure oils should do neither of those. One of these day I will have to do a video for you tube to show this reaction and the brands that do that!
Black bean brownies are a delicious and nutritious twist to a traditional chocolate brownie. You might be nervous about baking with black beans, but don’t be – they have a very mild flavor and are extremely rich, creamy, and full of protein. You can also boost the flavor of your brownie with essential oils such as Peppermint, Wild Orange, Cinnamon, or even Lavender.
Frankincense can be used for depression, inflammation, immunity, and to increase spiritual awareness.Today, scientists, physicians and researchers are beginning to return to the use of essential oils as a way to naturally and holistically heal our bodies. Frankincense actually has a history of medicinal use and could be quite helpful in your medicine cabinet.

I learned a lot scanning the Blog about EO’s. Was considering gathering 3-4 I use a lot and sharing with the family as Xmas gifts. The Blog site really helped – especially Crubchy Betty’s list of 21 essential bits of info.I have only bought at GNC (ugh) but nice to have more options as fas as quality and price. I use peppermint EO just a drop iunder my nose at night to open up my sinuses and it works great! The peppermint is also helpful on temporals and behind the ears for sea sickness! And when I can’t sleep, the lavendar works wonders. Ginger is also a powerful anti-nausea EO for me.

First let me say if you are using terms like "first pressing" then you've really got some catching up to do on your essential oil education. Most all essential oils are steam distilled, in fact this is inherent to the very definition of an essential oil. The only oils that are considered to fall under the definition of the term "essential oil" and are not produced by steam distillation are the citrus oils, which are cold pressed from the citrus peel (and if its done properly there would not be any oil left in the peel for a second pressing LOL). So when one refers to the so called "first pressed" essential oils they does not even portray an accurate method of production of almost every essential oil out there, since almost every oil is produced by distillation, not by pressing. Please avoid this "pressing" terminology unless you want to just sound like a complete novice to the field. When the pressed method is applicable, in the industry we use the terms COLD PRESSED or EXPRESSED to describe the production of citrus oils (some citrus are also distilled but that’s another issue). So this brings us to the whole issue of the claimed "multiple distillations" of the same plant material. Consider this quote from a popular blog:

The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? Its important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by the company themselves and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgements about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.
In my quest, I had gotten so excited that I forgot to look into what these companies were telling me about their products. It took a blogging friend to point me to the path of truth and discovery. She recommended I check out a series of posts that a blogger friend of hers had done on this exact topic, which essential oils would be best to purchase. The first of seven posts, is called “The Great Essential Oils Showdown ~ Which Essential Oils Company is Best? – Part 1” and it is worth every second of reading! I began to search deeper, trying to find out which essential oils were higher quality and which weren't until I came across something that opened my eyes as to how I looked at these “high end” essential oils. (doTERRA will be my example, but Young Living is no better and is the example that doTERRA followed when they split off from them.)
Essential oils can be considered, fundamentally, as medication. Although derived from plants and natural resources they are still used as treatment for health ailments. The oil’s high concentration makes them very powerful and potentially dangerous substances if used incorrectly. It is imperative that you do thorough research before using any essential oil, because if used improperly they can cause serious health issues like allergic reactions, rashes, burns and long-term internal damage. The temptation to self-diagnose and self-prescribe can be a great influence in using essential oils, but without professional diagnosis and supervision you run a risk of causing yourself harm. With that in mind here are some very important guidelines to follow:
I’m new to the world of EO’s. A doTerra-using friend made a “concoction” help my sinuses drain during an infection. EO’s involved are: eucalyptus, rosemary, melaleuca, doTerra’s Breathe blend, lime, and lavender in a coconut oil base. I slathered the oil mixture on my facial sinus areas, using the oils about 7 or 8 times in a 12 hour period. When I got up the next morning and washed my face, my face felt like I’d gotten a mild sunburn. Is this normal? Or an indication of anything? Too much EO to the face? Wrong choice of EO’s used for facial use? Thanks for any input!
First, we need to accept and understand that individual molecules are not alive but merely three-dimensional arrangements of atoms to form unique structures in space, held together by shared electron densities that we call “bonds.” As such, an individual molecule has no "knowledge" of the pathway by which it was created and how it behaves in any system is a function of its three-dimensional structure, not of it’s origin. A molecule of say L-menthol (the main component of peppermint essential oil) will behave EXACTLY the same in any environment whether that molecule of L-menthol was made by the peppermint plant or the BASF Chemical plant. When 10 carbon atoms and 15 hydrogen atoms come together in the arrangement shown in the picture below we have L-menthol, regardless of who or what orchestrated the atoms coming together in this arrangement. L-menthol is L-menthol because of its structure. The structure is what defines the molecule, not its source.

Dr. Robert Pappas says, “There are a lot of companies out there selling essential oils and most of them have no ability (or in many cases no desire) to do the necessary quality control to verify what they are getting from their supplier before they pass it on to their customers.” The GC/MS test determines quality and can show evidence of adulteration, although it is not perfect. Good companies will employ other tests as well like, Organoleptic (sensory tests), or FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy).
At NOW® we’ve established long-standing relations with our essential oil vendors, and we purchase our oils in large quantities that qualify for bulk discounts, which we then pass on to consumers in the form of everyday low pricing. We also sell direct to retailers instead of going through distributors, which can add as much as 30% to a product’s cost.
As far as uses to avoid when pregnant, use a reputable resource. No essential oils have been scientifically proved to be harmful to a developing fetus. There are some you should consult with your physician and some you should use caution with. You can use E.O’s during 1st trimester with caution. Here’s a good source to look at. It is a website based on Doterra Oils. http://www.everythingessential.me/Hints/ProperUse.html
Teresa, I’m an audiologist, and it sounds like you have intermittent tinnitus. Using oils on your neck isn’t going to affect your Eustachian tube, your Eustachian tube drains up by your adenoids. Intermittent tinnitus is pretty common, but it wouldn’t hurt to get a baseline audiogram done. If you have it only in one ear, it would be a good idea to get it checked to ensure it isn’t a symptom of a bigger concern. Good luck!

For example, Peppermint Essential Oil is used primarily as a flavoring for candies (i.e. Candy Canes), chewing gum and ice creams. It is often referred to on food ingredient labels as Oil of Peppermint or simply as Peppermint Oil. Because large food/candy manufacturers must produce a consistently flavored product, the intensity, aroma and overall flavor of the peppermint oil they use must remain consistent between each lot of oil that they purchase. Peppermint Oil manufacturers/distributors, therefore typically standardize the essential oils that they sell by establishing a blueprint of the percentage that each important constituent should reach within each essential oil. They then test the oil and then adjust the oil by adding or removing constituents until the resulting oil meets the ideal percentage.


Citrus Essential Oils are often thought of for their light, summery aromas, but I love using citrus oils all year round. My use of the citrus oils increases during the colder months as I find them energizing and help to uplift the spirits. They are the perfect complement to blends that fight off the winter blues, "cabin fever" and depression. Read about the aromatic properties of each of the citrus essential oils.

I strongly encourage you to get a copy of Higley’s book “Reference Guide to Essential Oils” as it will help you learn about what oils you can and cannot use with children, which oils have been noted to help with which conditions and which oils are considered Generally Regarded as Safe for ingestion. There are other books out there, lots of testimonials by users of EOs, and lots of suggestions on pinterest. Please do not let naysayers like Jena frighten you away from EOs and do your research, learn all that you can. Also bear in mind that each person responds to and smells the oils differently so take time to get to know your response to each oil and how much carrier you need to prevent skin irritation. This is a learning experience that can positively change your life if you let it!
For past few years, there is a rapid expansion of natural products in food and beverage industries. It is expected to contribute a great economic ratio in upcoming years. No matter, you want an effective massage, aromatherapy, relaxation therapy or any other treatment, organic essential oils will work as the best stimulation remedies for you always.
THE NEW AGE OF ESSENTIAL OILS. Feel the transformation with our standardized, 100% ISO certified, and Medicinal Oil Association approved essential oils. Essential oils are the power of mother nature in the palm of your hand. Only the purest of sources can give you an abundance of natural healing phytochemicals. Only ZEVA brings you the pure medicinal power of Mother Nature, giving you a truly unique experience that you won’t find from any other source. You’ll feel the difference with true medicinal grade essential oils from ZEVA- the new age of essential oils.ZEVA Oils are the only ISO Certified and USA Medicinal Oil Association Certified Essential Oil. There is nothing else like it. We ensure 100% potency and purity. Undiluted, ZERO Toxicity.
Though the solvents are reclaimed by distillation, these absolute oils are not actually re-distilled because the essential oil portions are left intact and not torn apart into constituents during the distillation process. We only offer these two absolute oils due to the rarity and high cost of obtaining steam-distilled rose or jasmine essential oils, which would be many times the price of our absolute products.
Hi. I have a question. I have always read that in order to make essential oil you need tons of a plant to get a little bit of the the oil itself, like you mentioned in the article. So it seems like something that can only be made industrially. But I also see recipes for homemade essential oils. So, my question is: Are these homemade oils real essential oils? Or is there another name for those ones? Are they as good in terms of benefits for the skin and its scents properties?

Let’s address the issue of ‘health advocates’ giving out prescriptive advice of essential oils. I mentioned that I will sometimes prescribe internal essential oils for short periods of time.  As a qualified health herbalist and naturopath, I have an intricate understanding of human anatomy, physiology, and metabolism. I can look at research and decide on the safety profile of a new medicine before I prescribe it to my patients. Although essential oil health advocates are well-meaning (I truly believe they are) they simply are not qualified to be giving out health advice. I’m actually fine with them recommending certain oils and blends for diffusing, but I’d even be cautious to take advice on topical applications from someone who was not trained in aromatherapy. I’ve seen countless facebook posts of well-meaning advocates recommending everything from the neat (undiluted) use of essential oils on children, essential oil ‘cocktails’ with 2-3 drops of each oil (I’m not kidding). I’ve also heard countless horror stories of rashes, irritations, diarrhea and headaches from use.

Research has shown that essential oils have potential as a natural pesticide. In case studies, certain oils have been shown to have a variety of deterring effects on pests, specifically insects and select arthropods.[27] These effects may include repelling, inhibiting digestion, stunting growth,[28] decreasing rate of reproduction, or death of pests that consume the oil. However, the molecules within the oils that cause these effects are normally non-toxic for mammals. These specific actions of the molecules allow for widespread use of these green pesticides without harmful effects to anything other than pests.[29] Essential oils that have been investigated include rose, lemon grass, lavender, thyme, peppermint, and eucalyptus.[30]
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