Most essential oils are distilled and standardized (adulterated) for use in other industries, so those carefully sourcing and selling essential oils intended for aromatherapy and therapeutic applications understandably do want a way to convey the suitability, purity and quality of their oils for therapeutic uses. Soil conditions, seed quality, climate, altitude, growing conditions, harvesting, the care during distillation, bottling and storage can all play a part in the resulting quality of an essential oils. These are all factors that conscientious suppliers pay close attention to. Using these two-word terms seemed to be a concise way for suppliers to designate that their oils were suitable for use by those seeking oils for use in holistic aromatherapy.
Love this article and your references!! Much appreciated from someone who is new to the aromatherapy world and wanting more information. I hope to understand how to use EO for my family. I signed up with DoTERRA to get training and so far a month in haven’t received much training. So now I look for articles like this…wish I had a friend who was certified in aromatherapy so I can help my whole family understand what to use and how to use it with different problems. Reading articles helps but I definitely get overwhelmed with all the information…anyways love this article! Thanks!!
You said that YL and other MLM companies buy some of their oils from other suppliers. YL’s promotional DVDs and literature make viewers believe that everything in their bottles is in their control from “seed to seal.” However, upon closer inspection of one of their manuals, I do see references to their purchases from other distillers (upon whom they put high standards). YL stresses the importance of such things as the precise timing of harvesting plants (even to the time of day), and the timing in distilling plants (and heat/pressure used). They deem all these things as absolutely vital to making a high quality, “therepeutic” essential oil.
By the time I first learned about holistic aromatherapy, a number of companies, including those that I otherwise find highly reputable, were also using the terms therapeutic grade and/or aromatherapy grade. I didn't see anything malicious with these terms and the terms seemed to act as a way to quickly convey to consumers that the seller's essential oils were carefully sourced specifically for use by those seeking oils for holistic aromatherapy use.
In conventional research studies, it is important to be able to determine exactly what caused the outcome. In essential oil therapy, the oils are sometimes applied with massage, which makes it difficult to tell whether or not the outcome was due to the essential oil alone, or the massage, or the combination. Also, essential oils are composed of hundreds of chemical constituents, and it is hard to determine which ones may have produced the desired effect.
I was wondering. You said that you should never take essential oils internally. But I’ve always been told that what you can’t tack internally, you shouldn’t put on your skin. The only exception to this rule I can think of would be something that would hurt you digestive system if you swallowed it, but is okay for your body otherwise. Plus some oils are made out of foods, like rosemary, so why cant we eat the oils? Does something bad happen to the oils after processing? If so, then why would you want it on your skin or in the air you breath.
In my ever growing quest to find the healthiest options in my life, I began to wonder what about my essential oils? It's true that with the help of essential oils (and a healthy GMO-free diet), my family hasn't actually been sick in about a year and a half. That is a LONG time!!!! Before essential oils entered the picture, I was constantly fighting off sinus infections, colds, the flu….you name it, and I was possibly experiencing it. Essential oils have become my go-to every time I have had something come up; from cleaning, to medical, to emotional, each time I have found success in my quest to keep my family healthy. Only now, am I asking, “What about my essential oils?”
Please don't fall into the old frequency trap that has been circulating around the internet since the 1990s. The problem with all this is that 99% of people don't understand quantum mechanics well enough to be able clearly see through the scam, or if they do suspect its a scam they don't have the background to articulate why Its a scam so they just don't comment at all. It is well known in science that molecules are constantly absorbing and emitting electromagnetic radiation of various types and many different frequencies. But the way that the typical eo frequency scam is described makes no scientific sense at all. I think part of it started as a way to sell high priced and useless frequency measuring equipment.
There were only a few things I was unhappy with, but they weren't important enough to lower my rating. First, I had to use a lot of cinnamon bark oil, and I mean A LOT, in my diffuser for it to really be noticeable. It's only been two weeks, and I'm three-fourths of the way through a 30 ml bottle! As others have mentioned, the oil comes out of the droppers really fast. You have to be extra careful. Lastly, I don't care for the residue that the cinnamon bark oil leaves in my diffuser. It has turned the inside a yellow, goopy mess, and I dripped the oil onto the front of my diffuser and it completely erased the ink to all of the words and numbers!
An essential oil that exhibits this quality will cause burning or skin pigmentation changes, such as tanning, on exposure to sun or similar light (ultraviolet rays). Reactions can range from a mild color change through to deep weeping burns. Do not use or recommend the use of photosensitizing essential oils prior to going into a sun tanning booth or the sun. Recommend that the client stay out of the sun or sun tanning booth for at least twenty-four hours after treatment if photosensitizing essential oils were applied to the skin. Certain drugs, such as tetracycline, increase the photosensitivity of the skin, thus increasing the harmful effects of photosensitizing essential oils under the necessary conditions. Table 3 lists some common essential oils considered to be photosensitizers.
Plants, like other living things, need to protect themselves from various types of predators. Plants use terpenoid compounds to deter insects and other animals from approaching them. Shawe pointed out that “insects are very rarely found on peppermint plants and the presence of linalol in the peel of citrus fruits confers resistance to attack by the Caribbean fruit fly.” 5 The Douglas fir tree releases a complex mixture of volatile oils, or terpenes, from their needles to defend against the spruce budworm. Even more fascinating is that the Douglas fir trees “will vary the composition and production of terpenes each year thus decreasing the ability of the budworm to develop widespread immunity to specific compounds.6
From the cultivation of aromatic plants to shipping, we are acutely conscious of environmental sustainability, conservation of natural resources and recycling options. We promote biological cultivation as an investment in our children‘s future and work with regenerative energy from Greenpeace Energy. Shipping is climate-neutral. We prefer to use FSC® or PEFC-certified raw materials from climate-neutral and sustainable cultivation for packaging, brochures and this catalogue.
Carrier oils are used to dilute essential oils when they are being used topically; they help to carry the essential oils into the skin. Many lotions and skin care products are made with carrier oils, which are vegetable oils derived from the fatty portion of the plant, such as the nuts, kernels or seeds. Unlike essential oils, carrier oils do not evaporate easily and do not give off strong aromas.

Because of email disclaimers, I cannot share the response I received without infringement. What I can say is that the company responded quickly, and included a proclamation from an apparent "third party expert". I sent this to an essential oil expert I have worked with and trust who confirmed that much of it was fancy language to confuse consumers, but it didn't respond to the query of whether a batch of their oils had been contaminated and what is being done to ensure this is no longer happening.


Hey everyone! I wanted to share my experience with essential oils with you. I have tried many different brands before I came across Young Living essential oils. At first it was more about saving money, but after a while of not getting any results I decided to try out the good stuff. Yes, I am talking about YL(Young Living) lol. Their oils have helped me with both anxiety and depression. If you do all your homework you will learn a lot about YL. They are not just pure essential oils. A lot of time and work is packed into each one of their bottles. The distilling process that they use is done just right also. That is a huge key to a good product. I personally think the only down fall are their prices. Who wouldn’t rather pay $5 for an essential oil? The truth is you get what you pay for? That goes for many things in life. Im a mother and not a wealthy person, so saving cash is very important to me. However, my health is above that. Which is why I chose to take a leap in becoming a wholesale member with YL. Funny part is I went the wholesale route over the retail route for one reason….24% less costs. Who doesnt want to save money these days? After a short time I learned much more about the company and many of their oils. Now I share all my knowledge on FB and hopes to help others find alternative medicine routes. If you decide you want to buy from YL, don’t pass up the 24% discount. There are no crazy catches and all you need is an employer/sponsor ID. I am more than happy to share mine with you! Than if you have any questions as your sponsor I am more than happy to assist you. 1917152 P.S. remember these oils sell themselves. They are just that good. God bless!
After using it for over a week I'm very impressed. I had also ordered other Frankincense oils from other vendors and this one is or has the highest antiseptic quality! I know this because I've used a few different brands on some skin abrasions and this one dropped me to my knees in pain. It really needs to be diluted, so far warning it's that powerful! It worked within days of using it on some reddish patch of skin on my face and worked well! I highly recommend this brand!
There is no difference between wintergreen oil toxicity and methyl salicylate toxicity. Methyl salicylate is one of the ingredients in Listerine, so many people use it daily in a mouthwash, and very small amounts may be ingested. As always, toxicity is in relation to dose. I would suggest that wintergreen oil is not one that should be taken orally as a medicine, unless under the supervision of a doctor or herbalist. There have been many fatalities from (accidental) overdose, and there are a number of toxicity issues – it’s fetotoxic, there are several reasons why it could be problematic in children, it’s extremely blood-thinning, and should be avoided by people with GERD. So it’s not just a question of how much is toxic – it’s also about individual sensitivity. It should absolutely never be taken during pregnancy. Like all salicylates, it causes fetal malformations. Even externally, it can cause problems. I believe it has now been taken out of Tiger Balm because so many people in Asia were experiencing blood-thinning problems (internal bruising in people on blood-thinning drugs).
Thank you so much for the objective, thorough information! I have some questions about “organic certification”. My understanding, with plants or foods that are produced organically, is that 100% organic is impossible because of cross contamination. So in the case of EO’s is organic less important because any chemical (ie pesticides, herbicides) that is not part of the oil is removed in the distillation process, or it is considered adulterated? For example, a company might state their oils are “certifiably organic” but they could still be contaminated because this certification allows a small percentage of contaminants. Any clarification would be greatly appreciated!

I am all new to this, so don’t judge to hard. I am wondering if ESSENTIAL OILS HELP WITH PAIN/SORENESS? For example, getting leg cramps in the middle of the night where it wakes you up from a dead sleep and all you can think of doing is walking it off and then the aftermath soreness is still there gets quite aggravating after about the first two times. Being a semi non believer in pills, I’m looking for alternatives. Would essential oils be something that would help in this particular situation? If so, any recommendations? THANKS IN ADVANCE!

This is really a good synopsis of important things to know, good job!! Just wanted to correct one point though. According to essential oil expert Robert Tisserand, being allergic to , say, ginger tea does NOT necessarily mean you’d be allergic to ginger essential. Plants and their corresponding EO’s do not necessarily have the same properties or actions. A patch test can be done if one is concerned about the possibility of being allergic to an essential oil.


Essential oils are in fact NOT oils at all, they’ve simply acquired that name because they do not mix with water, just like regular oils. They are a vital liquid present inside living plants — a natural solution of various complex chemical constituents. Scientifically, essential oils are concentrated aromatic volatile plant compounds (‘volatile’ meaning they can change state or evaporate very easily). They are mostly derived from the flowers, leaves, stems and fruits of plants, while some are extracted from the bark and even the sap of trees.

Thank you for asking this question! I have spent countless hours researching this very question, and have even contacted Young Living to get their response, all to no avail! I feel like someone is not being honest, and while I want to just go with YL, the fact that at first they didn’t respond and when the finally did (through a consultant who was on a live chat), the response was vague. It just makes me question if there is corruption in the EO industry like so many others. Would LOVE for someone to respond to this question!
You’ll find essential oils offered everywhere from gifts shops to large retailers, and, of course, online. You may want to start your search for essential oils with reputable companies such as DoTERRA, Young Living Essential Oils, Ancient Apothecary, Living Libations and Edens Garden. Keep in mind, essential oils break down over time, so check your expiration dates; you’ll want one that’s two to three years out from the time of purchase. Make sure you avoid these essential oil safety mistakes.
Previously mentioned in Module 3, the chemical profile of an essential oil is a crucial determinant of the overall quality. Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade® essential oils should always have certain ratios of the same core constituents, as these major constituents are largely what determine how the oil will interact in the body. Because essential oils are pure botanical extracts, the ratio of constituents will fluctuate slightly depending on the geographic location, weather conditions, soil conditions, insect presence, precipitation, temperature, distillation conditions, etc. Quality control tests should be used to monitor the chemical profile of each batch of oil and determine if it fits within the proper ranges that will result in beneficial health effects.
“Aromatherapy grade” and “fragrance grade” means it not 100 percent pure essential oil, but has had other oils added, such as carrier oils and/or synthetic components of the natural oil. “To be considered a therapeutic oil, it must be completely free of any and all chemicals as well as slowly and carefully extracted via methods that keep the original compounds in its natural state,” says Dr. Axe. These healing scents will help you feel better.

Lavandula angustifolia has definitely become the gold standard for Lavender in modern times, but this seems to have had the effect of reducing the other 38 species of Lavender to “second rate” status, even when it is reluctantly conceeded that they aren’t adulterated or synthetic. The belief that Lavender 40/42 is low quality, unsuitable for aromatherapy or perfumery and only good enough for soap or candle making is an unaccountable viewpoint that seems not to take into consideration how highly valued all these different species of Lavender have been to diverse cultures throughout the ages. It is the Lavandula genus in general that has been so important to the history of perfumery and natural medicine, and in no way Lavandula angustifolia in particular. The celebration of so-called “True Lavender” is a relatively new fad in the very long history of natural medicine and aromatic art. Even if Lavandula angustifolia is the finest Lavender, and it may very well be so, why Lavender 40/42, which is really just a blend of these wonderful Lavender oils from around the world should be so scorned, I cannot say. 


The information provided on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication without first consulting your physician.
Just to give anyone interested a typical example analysis, the picture below is of a certified organic lavender that I recently analyzed for a customer. As you can see the peak at 26.435 shows camphor present at 0.25%. Also, if you want peer reviewed literature references showing that camphor should indeed be in lavender, just login to my EO Chemical Reference database and you will see plenty of detailed reports, with journal citations, confirming exactly what I am talking about.
None. Essential oils are wonderful, but I would never recommend taking them internally unless you are being treated by a Clinical Aromatherapist. Since most EOs are antimicrobal you can really upset your gut flora by taking them long term. And since 85% of your immunity is in your gut, that’s really something you don’t want to do unless you are under the treatment of someone with the above-listed training.
Do they sell essential oils of plants that are endangered? There are quite a few companies that are harvesting and using essential oils of plants that are endangered. You should be asking where your essential oil has come from; is it “endangered” and is the supplier trying to sell you an inferior/substituted product in its place, claiming that it is the same “quality” and standard.  If it is extracted from an endangered plant species, what is the current level of threat to that plant species? Finally, is there an alternative essential oil, with similar chemical components and properties that you could be using? You can keep track of current endangered aromatic species on cropwatch.org
Some other common examples of natural oil components crystalizing in at freezer temperatures are things like cedrol in Texas cedar wood oil, menthol in corn mint oil, methyl thujate in giant arborvitae wood oil, nepetalactone in catnip oil and thymol in thyme oil just to name a few. There are some oils that will crystalize merely in the refrigerator, for example rose oil from Bulgaria has waxy hydrocarbon components that will solidify giving the oil a solid gelatinous appearance. And then there are even some steam distilled oils, for instance Zadravets oil from Bulgaria (Geranium macrorrhizum) and Orris root (Iris pallida), that are completely solid at room temperature.
Having taught in universities and studied various healing arts modalities for over a decade, I unhesitatingly recommend Aromahead’s  Aromatherapy Certification Program to everyone – from beginner to daily user. The format is super user-friendly and content is beyond rich. The extensive case studies and amazing feedback set me on a great path of understanding how oils could be used to move the body into a deeper healing state. I now feel confident I’m moving into my aromatherapy practice in a mindful, safe, and ethical way.
I’ve been taking Aura Cacia lavender oil internally – a couple of drops sling with do terra lemon and peppermint in water – swishing then swallowing. Is it a bad idea for me to take the Aura Cacia internally like this? I’ve been completely ignorant! I’m doing this to stay away from pharmaceuticals so definitely don’t want to be causing any worse problems. Thanks in advance…
Happy customers are of ultimate importance to Lisse essential oils. You can easily reach their customer service team Mon – Fri, 9 AM – 4 PM PST at 1-800-280-1973 or using the email contact form through their website. I’ve personally had great success talking with Lisse essential oils so I can say for sure there are real people with real passion behind this company.
But microbiome damaging effects aside, is it safe to be ingesting an extract of the essential oils from a plant? Many oils are irritant and known to cause skin sensitivity in some people, however, MLM reps are recommending you ‘add 1-2 drops to a glass of water’ and drink it. It is not fully known how essential oils are metabolised. The essential oils are the most potent substance in the plant and should be treated with far more respect. The only cases of serious harm from essential oil use have been when it has been consumed internally. On poisons.org a clinical toxicologist states that the internal use of both eucalyptus and sage oil has caused seizures.
Frankincense can be used for depression, inflammation, immunity, and to increase spiritual awareness.Today, scientists, physicians and researchers are beginning to return to the use of essential oils as a way to naturally and holistically heal our bodies. Frankincense actually has a history of medicinal use and could be quite helpful in your medicine cabinet.
All absolutes are prepared by first extracting the oil from the plant matter using the solvent hexane. This solvent is then evaporated and removed via a stripping distillation process to typically less than one part per million (ppm) remaining, producing what is called a concrete. This concrete is a combination of the plant’s essential oil as well as co-extracted plant waxes. The essential oil is separated from the concrete by ethanol, leaving behind the plant waxes. The ethanol is then actively removed from the remaining material in a second evaporation process, separating the essential oil portion, which is now called an “absolute.” Residual ethanol is typically less than 1 ppm in the absolute material.

If you are using Firefox or Google Chrome as a browser there is an app/add-on called “adblocker plus”. Download and install it. When you see floating icons like that and they bother you, right-click over them and scroll down to “block element” or “use adblock” and click OK/Submit/Add. This will remove the floating script/image and allow for better viewing.
To answer your question I am going to make a suggestion – buy an oil from the grocery or drug store that your daughter in law has in stock from YL, arrange a time to go over to her home and smell the 2 bottles. As silly as it sounds you will be able to tell a difference just in the smell. And yes, you get what you pay for. Many grocery and drug store brands are 2nd, 3rd, even 5th and 6th distillations of the product, are often diluted with carrier, and are not as pure as YL or DoTerra. Both of those companies use the 1st distillation which is the most pure. As for carrier oils you can use coconut, grape seed, sweet almond, jojoba, olive, or even boring old vegetable oil.
Plant Therapy’s labels are a bit scarce in their information. They display the proper Latin names and the USDA Organic logo, but that’s it. Instead of including the country of origin and other important notes — which can be found on the website — they have a long description of what the oils could be used for and how to use it, followed by an FDA disclaimer so they won’t get in trouble.

Unfortunately, this ignited and resurfaced some of the studies that are often quoted regarding the toxicity of essential oils and children. These sources for toxicity where some of the very same ones in which I reviewed and discussed the caveats to here. The sources that are referenced by the poison center also were lacking in some information I was seeking. They do not include the essential oil company, quality of the oil, and some where related to one isolated or synthetic constituent. The parts of an essential oil are not the same as the synergy of the whole essential oil.
Hi Julie, it is entirely possible that you have had an allergic reaction to one of the essential oils you ingested. It is possible that that the lemon oil might have oxidized in the bottle in the store, and this increases the risk of allergy. It’s also possible that you are simply allergic to one of those oils. It has nothing to do with detoxing – that’s a total myth.
Hi. I have been using DoTERRA’s products for approx. 6 months in many ways, topically, diffuser, cleaning, cooking, etc. I recently had surgery and got a bad cold while in the hospital. I started using doTERRA’s OnGuard throat drops and continually got worse (I also suffer from asthma so was using my inhalers as well.). Do you think there is any way the drops killed too much of the good bacteria in my mouth and throat? Just wondering your thoughts on this. Looking forward to your feedback.

In our scent tests the Stillpoint’s oils started off smelling mild and fresh, but then after a minute or two they magically blossomed and became very rich, deep, vibrant, stronger and more clear; almost like a fine wine opens up after being uncorked for some time. And for those who may be sensitive to subtle energies, these oils possessed a very clean and high vibration, which is an enormous benefit when using the oils for spiritual practice. No other oils we tested performed this way.
In many industries (healthcare, agriculture, etc., as you are probably very familiar), there are Independent Certification Bodies, Accreditation Services, that are generally not-for-profit and independent—watchdogs who make sure that what companies say is happening is actually happening.  With every certification there are specific parameters that the product must meet: So for instance, in the US, the USDA sets the standards for organic agriculture, and any certifying bodies must be approved by the USDA to be credible. This system creates multiple levels of independent evaluation—and a company can't just claim that its products are organic, at least on packaging, unless it's been certified so by this system of certification. 
NOW’s founder Elwood Richard said it best when he was asked why NOW’s prices are so much lower than our competitors. “The question shouldn’t be why are our prices so low, but rather, why do our competitors price their products so high?” We use the same quality essential oils as other companies; we just choose to price our essential oils with the best interests of the consumer in mind. By not marking up our essential oils like perfumes, as many competitors do, we can offer essential oils of comparable quality at a lower price.

The main reason I will not buy essential oils from any of the MLM companies is because they lead their customers to believe that when they say their product is “Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade”, that means something of value in the essential oil and aromatherapy world. There were three shocking things that I learned to lead me to steer clear of these

I signed up to be a DoTerra Essential Oils consultant about a year ago, and I couldn’t be happier with my choice. I get high quality 100% pure therapeutic grade oils for a good price. I’ve used Frankincense and Lavender undiluted on my son since he was born. I’ve also taken advantage of my diffuser. My favorite blends to diffuse are their Breathe (which has been a lifesaver when my babe is congested -and the rest of the family too) and their On Guard. We diffused On Guard last fall quite often and nobody in our house caught so much as a cold. Which was so nice, considering the new baby in the house -and considering Hubby is a teach and typically brings bugs home at the start of new school years. My personal favorites are Lemon and Peppermint. I add a drop or two of lemon to my drinks when I feel a sore throat coming on, or when I feel like I need a bit of a mood/ energy lift. And peppermint works well for headaches and aches in general. 🙂 If you’re interested in DoTerra let me know. I live in the Colorado Springs area and I teach EO classes occasionally.
Unfortunately, this ignited and resurfaced some of the studies that are often quoted regarding the toxicity of essential oils and children. These sources for toxicity where some of the very same ones in which I reviewed and discussed the caveats to here. The sources that are referenced by the poison center also were lacking in some information I was seeking. They do not include the essential oil company, quality of the oil, and some where related to one isolated or synthetic constituent. The parts of an essential oil are not the same as the synergy of the whole essential oil.

I have enjoyed reading the continued conversation on this thread. Thank you, Lindalu for your comment about YL not training their people in aromatherapy–but just their version. I have been frustrated about the same thing, as I am beginning to realize that there are a bunch of rookies all around me (myself included), that are almost mindlessly using YL essential oils–even in potentially harmful ways–without having a clue as to what makes them tick!
NOTE: Much of the information in this column is derived from easily accessible books and websites, including Make an Informed Vaccine Decision for the Health of Your Child by Mayer Eisenstein, MD, JD, MPH; The Sanctity of Human Blood: Vaccination is Not Immunization, by Tim O’Shea,  DC; Screening Sandy Hook, Causes and Consequences by Deanna Spingola (an online e-book); the writings and lectures of Russell Blaylock, MD; Immunologist J. Barthelow Classen, MD; Harold E Buttram, MD, Dr Sherri Tenpenny, Dr Suzanne Humphries, Dr Kenneth Stoller, Dr Andrew Wakefield, Dr Mark Geier, and Dr Joseph Mercola, and the following two articles: http://www.vaccines.net/vaccine-induced-immune-overload.pdf. http://www.globalresearch.ca/vaccine-induced-immune-overload-and-the-epidemic-of-chronic-autoimmune-childhood-disease/5431013.
This is several months too late, but not even Young Living and doTerra eucalyptus are safe to ingest. I distribute doTerra and it is listed as NOT for internal use. When it is used as an ingredient for an internal blend or lozenges, the amount is incredibly small. It is safer to use eucalyptus as an inhalant or in a diffuser, or dilute in a chest rub.

What sets Young Living apart as the most reputable essential oil company? Young Living leads the industry with the stringent standards of our Seed to Seal® commitment, going above and beyond to provide our members with high-quality essential oils. The exhaustive standards we’ve carefully created put people first, with farms and partner farms around the world that carefully follow rigorous ethical and environmental standards while complying with laws to protect the land and its people.
I realize that it’s been a while since you posted this question, but hope this information helps anyway. My poor husband had the same problem with leg cramps. Took supplements for potassium and ate bananas and oranges like crazy. No difference. Heard then that the deficiency that causes these cramps is more likely related to magnesium, so he started taking a magnesium supplement. Still no difference.
The MOA will conduct various tests on each batch of oil. These tests will include Gas Chromatography having a column length 50 or 60 meters in order to accurately determine the oil constituents according to their certification process. This is not the only method that will be used due to the fact that creative chemical engineers can sneak synthetic ingredients into oils that GC equipment alone cannot pick up. However, using other methods, we will be able to determine whether or not an oil has been adulterated.
You said that YL and other MLM companies buy some of their oils from other suppliers. YL’s promotional DVDs and literature make viewers believe that everything in their bottles is in their control from “seed to seal.” However, upon closer inspection of one of their manuals, I do see references to their purchases from other distillers (upon whom they put high standards). YL stresses the importance of such things as the precise timing of harvesting plants (even to the time of day), and the timing in distilling plants (and heat/pressure used). They deem all these things as absolutely vital to making a high quality, “therepeutic” essential oil.
Not all essential oils are created equally, nor does more expensive necessarily mean “better.” There are certain brands I will use in a less therapeutic fashion (like for cleaning), because they’re far less expensive than their counterparts. When you see a wide fluctuation in price between, say, lavender essential oils, you can bet that the far less expensive one is likely lower in quality.
The word “experiment” in the above seems appropriate. Eyesight problems are difficult to treat, and once damage has occurred, recovery is not always simple. A 3% dilution may not be sufficient to cause corneal erosion, but on the other hand there is no evidence of any benefit. One concern is that the wrong dilution may be used, and the risk of this is substantial. For example, it would be easy to confuse “tbsp” with tsp”, resulting in a dilution of about 10% instead of 3%.
The Cedarwood Essential Oil is widely used in commercial soaps, cosmetics, perfumes, and especially in men's colognes. Atlas Cederwood is the most popular variety and has a woody, sweet, scent that is very sharp. The Cedarwood (Chinese) Essential Oil generally has a lower cedrol content than the Atlas, hence it is used more for its fragrance. Also, try our other varieties: Himalayan, Texas, Virginian.
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