The Aromatherapist generally desires to use the whole, naturally balanced, pure, natural oil. Pure essential oils may contain trace constituents, which may not as yet have been detected or identified which make up the totality of the oil. These would not be present in a reconstructed or synthetically produced oil. It is perhaps best to trust that nature will provide the correct balance. We are, after all, dealing with the soul of the plant, and who among us can reconstruct such a thing?
Hi. I’m hearing conflicting opinions regarding using lavender oil on my children. I have a 10 yr. old son & 7 yr. old daughter. I love to use the lavender with peppermint & lemon for my son’s allergies. I will also rub some on his temples for a headache. I will also apply to my daughter’s temples for a headache or put a couple drops in her bath. Is this OK? I’ve heard especially in boys that you should not use lavender because it has estrogen in it.
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Dr. Pappas is the President/Technical Director at Essential Oil University. Founded in 1999 by Dr. Robert S. Pappas, EOU is an educational/informational institution dedicated to essential oil production, chemistry and uses and has the largest online database for essential oil chemistry in the world. Dr. Pappas is also an adjunct Professor at Indiana University. Dr. Pappas work has made him a much-sought-after consultant for companies and individuals all over the world because the information he provides helps with quality assurance and with learning how an essential oil might be useful. Dr. Pappas created the Facebook page Essential Oil University which is dedicated spreading accurate information concerning essential oils and dispelling the myths that have been hyped over the years.
Just to give anyone interested a typical example analysis, the picture below is of a certified organic lavender that I recently analyzed for a customer. As you can see the peak at 26.435 shows camphor present at 0.25%. Also, if you want peer reviewed literature references showing that camphor should indeed be in lavender, just login to my EO Chemical Reference database and you will see plenty of detailed reports, with journal citations, confirming exactly what I am talking about.
Microbial testing involves analyzing a batch of essential oils for the presence of bio-hazardous microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and mold. The process involves drawing a sample and then adding that sample to a sterile growth medium in an enclosed dish or plate. The sample is incubated for a period of time and then observed for microbial growth. This test is performed on product entering the manufacturing facility and on finished products prior to distribution to ensure that the product has not been contaminated during the filling process.
Rachael Armstrong, a 44-year-old mother of five from Omaha, NE, learned this the hard way last year. After weeks of rubbing grapefruit oil on her feet as an appetite suppressant and spiking her water and laundry detergent with lemon oil, she developed a severe sensitivity to the sun that left her with blisters and welts after just a few minutes exposed to its rays. “I admit I was probably overusing them,” she says. “But I don’t think people are aware that even though they’re natural products, they can do real damage.”

In the case of the blue oils we see evidence of oxidation when the blue color becomes green over time. This is due to the degradation of chamazulene, the hydrocarbon responsible for the blue color in things like German chamomile, blue tansy, yarrow, etc. Its for these reasons that I always recommend that people refrigerate any of the blue oils and be sure to always keep a minimum amount of airspace in the bottle that you are storing these oils in so that the “greening” effect will be slowed down. Of course keeping airspace to a minimum is a good practice for all the essential oils but its absolutely crucial for the blue oils and for citrus oils.

To date, there has been no company or organization that certifies essential oils. The MOA was established to fill this need. Companies who wish to have an independent organization test the quality of their oils for ISO compliance can contact the MOA to conduct independent testing and certification. Companies who pass these tests can then proudly state that their essential oil is of ISO quality and therefore is a true “Medicinal Grade” oil. Ethical companies will use this standard in their marketing literature. Oils produced only for fragrance need not apply.

The Cedarwood Essential Oil is widely used in commercial soaps, cosmetics, perfumes, and especially in men's colognes. Atlas Cederwood is the most popular variety and has a woody, sweet, scent that is very sharp. The Cedarwood (Chinese) Essential Oil generally has a lower cedrol content than the Atlas, hence it is used more for its fragrance. Also, try our other varieties: Himalayan, Texas, Virginian.
Shannon, not all essential oils are created equal. Zija International has just launched its patented process of AMÉO Essential Oils product division. In particular their Peppermint Essential Oils is a powerful, distinct oil that immediately ignites the senses. Once inhaled or consumed, it goes right to work stimulating the mind and body. Peppermint oil is used aromatically, topically and internally to aid in digestive health, relieve stress and freshen breath. Massaging with the oil can help relieve skin redness and irritations. As far as usage is concerned AMÉO Peppermint oil is ATIDS based on the following key. A: AROMATICALLY – oils can be inhaled or diffused in the air, T: TOPICALLY – Oils can be applied to skin. Some oils require dilution with a carrier oil, I: INTERNALLY – Oils can be taken internally in food, beverages, or an Améo Veggie Cap, N: NEAT – Oil requires no dilution, D: DILUTE – Oil requires dilution with a carrier oil such as Améo Fractionated Coconut Oil, S: SENSITIVE SKIN – Oils should be used with caution on delicate skin; dilute with carrier oil, P: PHOTOSENSITIVITY – Oils require avoidance of direct sunlight or UV rays for at least 12 hours Member # 2424832
I decided that it was time to upgrade my essential oils, and signed up to sell doTERRA essential oils. I didn't really plan on selling essential oils to many people, as I was just looking to get the 25% off discount that you get for being an “Independent Product Consultant” or “IPC” as they call them. When the introductory 3-pack of essential oils (lavender, peppermint, and lemon) came in, I was really excited to smell the difference! The first one that I opened was the peppermint essential oil and I was shocked at what a candy-like smell it had. It smelled so deliciously sweet that I was blown away because all of the other peppermint essential oils that I owned smelled of  the herbaceous earthy peppermint that you find in the garden; doTERRA's peppermint essential oils smelled like the finest peppermint candy I had ever smelled. I assumed, that since these essential oils are 100% pure and “Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade”, that the higher end brands had better smelling peppermint. This excited me, I could smell a difference! I had been afraid that I wouldn't be able to smell the difference. The funny thing is, I thought that because the doTERRA essential oils smelled better AND are “Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade”, that they were better…but I was only listening to the MARKETING.

I have a question about allergies. I am not actually allergic to any food but I have oral allergy syndrome from having hay fever. Certain fresh veggies and fruits cause burning and itching in my mouth and sometimes other worse symptoms. I can’t eat avocados. Generally when these foods are slightly cooked or overly ripe I can have them. I’ve been wondering about using essential oils with avocado oil. I’ve had weird reactions with raw almonds but not roasted. It’s so weird! I’m weary of using almond or avocado carrier oils but I like the skin benefits of them. Any advice?


I myself have a preference for a particular company because of my own personal results and the consistent reports of my clients. I am also passionate about quality due to the way I use oils. I do stick with what has worked for me and my clients consistently. However, when reporting the information on this blog, I try to keep the facts and put my experience and company suggestions in a separate section and on a different website clearly delineated.
So you can see from this profile that the maximum amount of Camphor we will allow is 0.5%! A synthetic extract of Lavender called Lavandin contains 5-11% camphor and therefore may not be supportive of certain skin applications because of the camphor level. A truly pure lavender is excellent for the skin so if an oil matched the above phytochemical criteria, it can be called “Medicinal Grade”!
Another French contemporary, Dr. Jean Valnet, used therapeutic-grade essential oils to successfully treat injured soldiers during World War II. He then went on to become a world leader in the development of respected aromatherapy practices. The modern use of essential oils has continued to grow incredibly rapidly as health scientists and medical practitioners continue to research and validate the benefits of therapeutic-grade essential oil.
Its unfortunate to me that the people who created these nonsensical and inaccurate slogans regarding essential oils feel that they are necessary in order to sell product. When people just use the oils they get hooked, the oils sell themselves, people don’t need to be fed a bunch of airy fairy nonsense to fall in love with them. This idea of essential oils being the life blood of the plant has been around quite a while, in fact I think the alchemists might have believed the same thing (remember their belief in the “quintessential” which is where the term essential oil comes from), but hopefully we have progressed beyond 16th century knowledge and I would love to see a more responsible marketing approach in this day and age. However, I fear it may be a while before we can get everyone to let go of this one, it just sounds so darn good to the ears!
Then we purchased bottles of Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), and Lemon (Citrus limon) from each of the seven companies we selected to perform our in-house testing. We gathered a group of four people from our office and administered a formal blind smell test to evaluate which oils smelled the best and which smelled the worst out of the selections.
Good question. I wonder what the moisture content of the estimated weights are (HUGE difference as water makes up the majority of a plants’ weight). Nevertheless, I would guess that the environmental impact is minimal to none as most of these plants are numerous compared to harvesting other plants such as hardwoods, rain forest plants, and even corn. Take lavender for example, if it takes 100 lbs to extract 1 lb, that is barely nothing when you consider that lavender grows wild and is abundant. One acre of lavender would probably produce over a ton of plant parts in one mowing for oil extraction (I am guessing based on my experience with a variety of different plant “harvesting”). And it grows fast. To compare weight, imagine mowing a one acre field of mixed weeds 3 ft tall down to 6 inches, you would have a few thousand pounds of plants that would quickly and naturally grow back in a couple weeks. The rose petals are at the extreme ratio but are expensive and used far less than the common oils.
"Essential oils, like supplements, are not regulated by the FDA, so it's very, very important to do your research before purchasing essential oils, and have confidence in the purity of your product," said Lauren Dunaway, registered dietitian, owner of Essential Simplicity and distributor of Young Living essential oils. "Make sure that the company you purchase essential oils from has a commitment to quality and purity, from the fields in which they plant their seeds to how they distill the oils."
The medicinal use of therapeutic essential oils can be very helpful and may support the body to bring rapid and welcome relief from a great variety of symptoms. However, the medicinal use of essential oils provides only a part of the many unique and powerful benefits of these complex plant essences. Therefore, the medicinal use of essential oils is best used as part of a larger, more holistic context of health and wellness, which can include mainstream medicine.
Although they may not be the perfect replacement for all synthetic pesticides, essential oils have prospects for crop or indoor plant protection, urban pest control,[31] and marketed insect repellants, such as bug spray. Certain essential oils have been shown in studies to be comparable, if not exceeding, in effectiveness to DEET, which is currently marketed as the most effective mosquito repellent. Although essential oils are effective as pesticides when first applied in uses such as mosquito repellent applied to the skin, it is only effective in the vapor stage. Since this stage is relatively short-lived, creams and polymer mixtures are used in order to elongate the vapor period of effective repellency.[27]
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