Hi Megan I just started using Frankincense oil I bought from Walmart the Guruanda brand. I bought it for focus and memory. I have a test coming up this week and started using the oil for concentration. I believe its been helphing me but I have been told that Rosemary oil is better. What do you think of Guruanda. Recently I attended our Az State Fair and ran into a doTerra rep who swears their product is the best.
In short: DO NOT TAKE ESSENTIAL OILS INTERNALLY unless they have been prescribed to you individually by a qualified and clinically-trained medical professional or Clinical Registered Aromatherapist. When working with essential oils you are ultimately playing with chemistry; if you do not know the specific chemistry of the specific oils, and what that specific collection of chemical constituents in that oil can do to your body, then avoid internal administration and stick with the aromatic processes.
Hi Robert – I know I’ve read that more than a few times in some of the main stream aromatherapy books and think I was told that in my aromatherapy classes – about the 2% thing. So, it is a perception that I myself also have and have, therefore, spent long hours trying to determine if my sources are selling me what they say they are and who my sources should be – long hours and dollars spent to attend conferences to rub elbows with those who should know. However, at that time in 2006, organic essential oils were not readily or at all available. I have also read and have been told by those who should know, that just because an oil is certified organic, there is still no guarantee that said essential oil is not adulterated or for that matter really organic. The argument that I was given was that no one stays around to make sure that the material actually placed into the still was the same that was grown in the organic soil. We live in a world of distrust and for good reason as we look around at the greed in high places. I know this doesn’t address your issues about your article but was and always will be interested in any discussion concerning what constitutes an unadulterated oil. That being said, I would think there are certain things to consider when purchasing an oil and the chances it may or may not be adulterated. Some oils are naturally inexpensive and there would be nothing gained by adulterating them. If you look at how many acres of a particular oil are said to have been grown for a particular year and for that same year there was a great more essential oil sold than could have been produced – then you know you probably have an issue. I know that you know far more about this issue than I do, but I would like to see more discussion concerning what things would throw up a red flag when purchasing an oil from a particular supplier. The internet is now so absolutely full of people selling essential oils and copying and pasting the same old information that it is a bit overwhelming. My concern is the same as other clinical aromatherapists and that is that people will try a particular oil, find that it doesn’t work because it is either adulterated or the person selling the oil really doesn’t have a clue which oil or chemotype should be used for a particular purpose, so the client then assumes that any and all claims made by the aromatherapy industry are false or vastly overstated. This is true in research studies that have been done as well. Is there an answer? I would like to see an article by someone as knowledgeable as yourself that gives you a list of possible red flags and things to consider when looking for suppliers, particularly bulk suppliers.
Microbial testing involves analyzing a batch of essential oils for the presence of bio-hazardous microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and mold. The process involves drawing a sample and then adding that sample to a sterile growth medium in an enclosed dish or plate. The sample is incubated for a period of time and then observed for microbial growth. This test is performed on product entering the manufacturing facility and on finished products prior to distribution to ensure that the product has not been contaminated during the filling process.
Thank you for all this info. While a patient in the hospital, I would sprinkle a mix of lavender, eucalyptus, and peppermint oils in my pillow. It helped with my headaches and allowed me to relax. The nurses kept coming into my room just to inhale the wonderful scents. They took such great care of me that, after I was discharged, i went home and made 50 bottles of the same mixtures in cobalt blue bottles with roller balls. They loved them so much! They use them at home and at work. Being a nurse myself, I understand what they go through on a daily bases and how much these oils will benefit them. Even one of my doctors took several bottles I’ve made to give to patients!
As far as uses to avoid when pregnant, use a reputable resource. No essential oils have been scientifically proved to be harmful to a developing fetus. There are some you should consult with your physician and some you should use caution with. You can use E.O’s during 1st trimester with caution. Here’s a good source to look at. It is a website based on Doterra Oils. http://www.everythingessential.me/Hints/ProperUse.html
Thank you so much for this excellent distillation! I’m just beginning to use EO’s, and have had such excellent results that I am encouraged to try more — thank you for helping me find reputable companies to purchase from. The pricing comparison was especially helpful. My only issue so far is with Aura Cacia — the lids are so hard to get off the bottles — my 71 year old hands just can’t exert that much pressure any more — I emailed the company thru their website, and was sent alternative bottle caps, that didn’t even fit the bottles. Alas, not buying from them any more, which is unfortunate, since they are readily available in local stores. However, online ordering is easy and quick. Thank you once again!
I strongly encourage you to get a copy of Higley’s book “Reference Guide to Essential Oils” as it will help you learn about what oils you can and cannot use with children, which oils have been noted to help with which conditions and which oils are considered Generally Regarded as Safe for ingestion. There are other books out there, lots of testimonials by users of EOs, and lots of suggestions on pinterest. Please do not let naysayers like Jena frighten you away from EOs and do your research, learn all that you can. Also bear in mind that each person responds to and smells the oils differently so take time to get to know your response to each oil and how much carrier you need to prevent skin irritation. This is a learning experience that can positively change your life if you let it!
Rocky Mountain Oils (RMO) is a company based out of Orem, Utah, operating since 2004 and one of the leading essential oil brands available today. Not only can you buy essential oils at RMO, you’ll also find a comprehensive line-up of skin care, cleaning, wellness, body care, natural supplements, or aromatherapy blending supplies on their online shop.
I use Piping Rock EO and I love them. They do everything that any other brand does advice tried the more expensive ones like DoTerra and I find that Piping Rock is a great product with great results and one that I can easily afford. Sorry but those marketing companies are just about money. I love Essential Oils and how they have helped my family in so many ways with pain and other ailments. I also do not trust anyone who says to ingest the oils and unless a professional medical expert says it’s ok I think you are asking for trouble. You don’t have to pay ridiculous prices for good 100% pure Essential Oils.
question please, enjoyed the article thank you. Business aspect didnt work out, but use doTerra, because i trust their Testers/Scientists, but on the GRAS, if i go uptown, how do i know because it says that, its safe to ingest? doT is costly, so want to know how to answer ? or help others, after reading, all seems a scam in marketing. NOT in any way saying they do not work, they DO, i just want to know on what to trust to ingest, thank you so much, Teresa
48 detailed datasheets for the Essential Oils studied in the course. Aromahead's printer-friendly datasheets clearly lay out all the most important information you might need on hand for easy reference – including each oil's: therapeutic properties, emotional and energetic properties, safety data, chemical profile, Latin name, botanical family, plant part, plant origin, practical clinical applications, aroma, note, and extraction method.
The truth is that as long as you are mixing each oil in the EXACT same percentage in each trial, the order of blending each component would almost never reveal a significant effect. When people do claim to notice differences in blends based on order of component addition, its typically because they do not have the ability to conduct the experiment with quantitative accuracy. For example, it would not be a scientific experiment to do various blends using drops of essential oil from orifice reducer bottles or even by counting drops from a pipette. The reason being that drops are often drastically inconsistent, even when using the same oil with the same dropper. The only way to accurately put together the blends is to use a digital scale, I recommend one that can weigh out to at least 0.001 gram. If all the components are added to blend in the exactly the same amount each time the blend is made and the components mixed thoroughly then the odor and chemistry should be identical each time, regardless of order they were added to the blend.
I prefer Appalachian valley — they are a wholesale distributor as well but you can purchase small quantities from them as well. Use the code – roseotto and you can get their wholesale prices. If you purchase 5, 10, or 20ml bottles when you add them to the cart you will see a discount. I really love their products and got a sample of their frankincense – wow!! Love it.
Do not use essential oils internally unless directed by a qualified practitioner or using a professionally formulated blend labeled for internal use. Safety Guidelines for dilution and use must be followed. Any essential oils used must be pure and genuine. NAHA recommends purchasing from a reputable supplier who analyzes their oils by GC/MS. Please visit NAHA's approved schools to explore education in aromatherapy.
As the vaporized microscopic particles come into contact with the soft and moist tissue inside your nose and sinuses their beneficial properties enter directly into your bloodstream and get dispersed throughout your body. At the same time they travel up the olfactory nerve (the one that operates your sense of smell) to the limbic region of your brain where you process feelings and emotions. This is also an important area of the brain involved in memory. Smell and memory are processed through the same part of the brain; that’s why when you smell cookies baking in the oven you may have flashbacks of childhood.
Actually John, that isn’t entirely true. Unlike many products EOs are not required to list everything that is in them. Some grocery and drug store brands of EOs come already diluted only this isn’t mentioned on the bottle. You can unknowingly over dilute your EOs by adding additional carrier because you think the product you have gotten from the drugstore is pure.
Plants, like other living things, need to protect themselves from various types of predators. Plants use terpenoid compounds to deter insects and other animals from approaching them. Shawe pointed out that “insects are very rarely found on peppermint plants and the presence of linalol in the peel of citrus fruits confers resistance to attack by the Caribbean fruit fly.” 5 The Douglas fir tree releases a complex mixture of volatile oils, or terpenes, from their needles to defend against the spruce budworm. Even more fascinating is that the Douglas fir trees “will vary the composition and production of terpenes each year thus decreasing the ability of the budworm to develop widespread immunity to specific compounds.6
All companies and marketing aside, how do YOU most effectively use essential oils and do you have a resource to recommend that gives good guidelines to the beginner (i.e. which oils can be used topically and internally, and recommended dilutions, etc.) I have heard of a big reference book called The Complete Book of Essential Oils to be good–are you familiar with this title?
Thank You SO MUCH for this article. I recently saw something on tv !@ essential oils- I have been using essential oils for a couple of years – in a diffuser, in baths, roll-ons, etc.. I have been on the computer ‘googling’ for hours-this is the most informative & helpful information I have found-THANK YOU – YOU LISTED EVERYTHING I WAS LOOKING FOR!! (that being said, I am now throwing out the majority of my various botles of essential oils (diff. brands) because they contain synthetics WHICH IS ABSOLUTELY THE LAST THING I WANT OR NEED (I have CFIDS/FM) Thank You Again,
There is no evidence to suggest essential oils are effective (or safe) as the primary treatment of diseases and symptoms that fall outside the mind-body connection. Remember, when you use an essential oil and expect a specific outcome, you are relying on the biochemical activity of the compound in question. Many plants are biochemically active in humans and classified as drugs. These “natural” products have undergone rigorous scientific study to prove they work and determine what dangers they pose.
No, both our pure and natural essential oils and our certified organic essential oils are never diluted or watered down in any way. We do offer a variety of essential oil blends, some of which are combined with carrier oils such as jojoba, but these blends are manufactured specifically as blends and are clearly labeled as such to avoid any confusion.
One of my biggest frustrations of late has been a MLM company, I won’t name names and start a whole “thing”, but they state that they have a patent on “certified therapeutic grade”. In actuality, if you research the information, the only thing that is patented, is the logo that states “certified therapeutic grade”. It has nothing to do with the actual product, just the advertising.

I have always wondered why I have to pay so much more for do terra than AuraCacia oils and for that reason I am a fan of Aura Cacia. I recently learned that there are 1,2,3 and complete distillation and that first is the best. I unsure what either brand uses and don’t really know how to find out unless I get In direct contact with each company (not that hard). I want to buy some helichrysum italicum oil that through do terra is $100, Native American Nutritionals is $150 and aura cacia is $40. How can a consumer know if the $40 oil is just as good as the $150 oil? I believe they are all the same size. Are these companies taking us consumers for a ride? Thank you for your information.
From the best that I can understand it, YL claims that their method of testing goes far and beyond almost any other in the US. They state that the GC column length should be at least 50-60 meters in order to allow “double-phased ramping–which makes it possible to identify constituents that occur in very small percentages by increasing the separation of compounds.” YL states that almost all US labs only use a 30-meter column in their testing. The extent of this testing apparently is able to spot possible toxins that would be damaging to the brain, etc. at a molecular level.
DaNelle started to take an interest in a healthier lifestyle after suffering from two debilitating chronic diseases. On a mission to create a farm of her own, DaNelle forced, or rather 'lovingly persuaded' her husband to purchase a ranch home on an acre of land and transform it into their very own urban farm. DaNelle blogs at Weed 'em & Reap where she writes about the sustainable backyard farming, traditional food, & natural remedies.
very interesting. I am just a stay at home mama trying to do the best for my family. We use EO’s everyday, I clean with them, I diffuse them and I ingest them. If my throat is sore, I have a mixture of straight oils that I take, I’m not endorsing a brand, but I have several mixtures that have cured my asthma and my sons, we both put them directly in our chest. I’ve been to my natural path and he doesn’t endorse this particular brand but he tested the oils in is and to,d us which ones were beneficial to each of us. If you have access to a certified herbalist who can do energy testing it is very helpful to find out what works for you- if you can get passed the cost 😉

Hey! I akso struggle with acne of all sorts. The best thing I have found is tea tree oil and lavender. I used to dilute it in jojoba oil and that worked great, but not fast enough for my upcoming wedding, so I dilute it in water now until it clears up. The tea tree oil is great for skin and the lavender helps with the redness and inflammation.but, the best thing you can do for your acne is drink lots of water, green tea, and dilluted ACV, exercise, and cut out processed foods, starting with refined sugar.
Developing essential oil standards for essential oil therapy/aromatherapy has been discussed in several circles over the years, but because of cost of administration, setting up labs, certifying them and the analysis cost all by itself, it has turned out to be an overwhelming task and cost that only a well-organized and well funded organization could handle. But, an organizational attempt to deal with the analytical and administrative challenge for self-regulation would be desirable before essential oil therapy/aromatherapy looses its “therapy” from an overdose of bad oils.
Certain essential oils are safe to use during pregnancy, but care must be taken when selecting quality and brand.[51] Some essential oils may contain impurities and additives that may be harmful to pregnant women. Sensitivity to certain smells may cause pregnant women to have adverse side effects with essential oil use, such as headache, vertigo, and nausea. Pregnant women often report an abnormal sensitivity to smells and taste,[52] and essential oils can cause irritation and nausea when ingested. Always consult a doctor before use.
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