Teresa, I’m an audiologist, and it sounds like you have intermittent tinnitus. Using oils on your neck isn’t going to affect your Eustachian tube, your Eustachian tube drains up by your adenoids. Intermittent tinnitus is pretty common, but it wouldn’t hurt to get a baseline audiogram done. If you have it only in one ear, it would be a good idea to get it checked to ensure it isn’t a symptom of a bigger concern. Good luck!
* Disclaimer: The entire contents of this website are based upon the opinions of Dr. Axe, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective author, who retains copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Axe and his community. Dr. Axe encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.
Smell plays a big role in how essential oils may affect the body: When breathed in, these plant oils stimulate smell receptors in the nose that send chemical messages through nerves to the brain's limbic system, which affects moods and emotions, and may have some physiological effects on the body, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). (When used on the skin, the oils are absorbed into the bloodstream.)
This is a must-have dietary or culinary oil, Febuary said. They both recommend starting your day with lemon water, using a drop of lemon oil and a tiny pinch of salt. Add a drop to savory foods like fish or chicken recipes that call for lemon juice, and use it to create vinaigrettes and marinades to add a bright flavor to summer salads and grilling.
One very public example of this came in September of 2014 when the FDA cited both dōTERRA and Young Living, multi-level marketing essential oil companies. FDA agents found clear evidence that some of Young Living and dōTERRA reps were making claims that their oils could prevent and cure Ebola and many other illnesses! The situation was quickly remedied.
EXCELLENT BUY!! As a herbalist and soap maker, I use a variety of oils from various companies all over the world. The price for these was SO low that I thought, at the very least, I could use them for aroma therapy. They arrived in a beautifully designed box - professionally labeled and WOW was I STUNNED - the fragrance of each one showed very little difference from my finest oils that I have paid MUCH more for! As I am not a chemist - I cannot vouch for the percentages of each constituent, but I can tell you that the oils from the set that I have used thus far - have shown themselves to be just as effective as the high dollar bottle I have bought elsewhere! EXCELLENT Job - I sure hope they restock soon - I am buying MORE!
If you’re looking for German chamomile, which promotes tranquility and relaxation, don’t just buy any bottle with the word “chamomile” on the label. “The specific species of the plant the oil comes makes a big difference in some cases,” says Dr. Burke. For example, plants in the chamomile group have different chemical compositions. Take German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) for instance; it has a different chemical composition than Roman chamomile (Anthemis nobilis).”If it just says ‘chamomile’ then you should assume it is a mixture of the cheapest chamomile available,” says Dr. Burke. These are the best essential oils for fighting colds and flu.

Do they sell essential oils of plants that are endangered? There are quite a few companies that are harvesting and using essential oils of plants that are endangered. You should be asking where your essential oil has come from; is it “endangered” and is the supplier trying to sell you an inferior/substituted product in its place, claiming that it is the same “quality” and standard.  If it is extracted from an endangered plant species, what is the current level of threat to that plant species? Finally, is there an alternative essential oil, with similar chemical components and properties that you could be using? You can keep track of current endangered aromatic species on cropwatch.org
In the research and development from pharmaceutical products it is a main part to specify the quality of the active and auxiliary materials, manufacturing process and control methods are determined, the health harmlessness and the clinical effects are evaluated. So that every medicinal product with its characteristics or quality fits with the registered type, the quality assurance system of the manufacture has to make a back up of every batch.

No, both our pure and natural essential oils and our certified organic essential oils are never diluted or watered down in any way. We do offer a variety of essential oil blends, some of which are combined with carrier oils such as jojoba, but these blends are manufactured specifically as blends and are clearly labeled as such to avoid any confusion.
The Ananda Apothecary operates business hours of Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm MST. You can call 1-303-440-3766 for Customer Service or contact custserv@anandaapothecary.com. This brand also offers a newsletter, social media channels, and a neat “Aroma Science” section where you can learn a whole bunch of detailed essential oil information from their staff chemist (who is also their most active writer).
I’m sensitive to many sources and when my acupuncturist applied peppermint oil to an aching shoulder it sent me right into orbit. Anxiety and blood pressure were out of control for several days. I have always been able to eat peppermint with no problem but the oil while applied to the skin was way too intense. Now just the scent of it sets me off. Be careful.
Organic Farms. These farms practice organic cultivation, yet are not independently monitored. This is usually due to the lack of an agency in the area. Farms in more remote areas are usually unable to purchase the herbicides and fertilizers due to their cost. Personal contact with the farm is required to confirm that their cultivation is organic and clean, producing quality essential oils.
"Peppermint is an interesting plant in that it yields more oil than most others. As such, large farms and distilleries extract a bunch of oil from the peppermint plant. Smaller farms do a first distillation of peppermint that they sell to oils companies for the highest price. The peppermint is then re-distilled at a higher pressure and higher temperature for a 2nd distill, and the resulting oil is sold for less money to soap companies, and the like, that want a lower cost oil, but still desire a slightly “herby” smell. The plant is then re-distilled one more time at a yet higher temperature and pressure for a 3rd distill, which is sold to companies wanting the candy-cane smelling oil."
Thank you for taking time to answer my questions. I still feel a bit muddled about the subject, and still don’t feel that I have confident, validated proof to stand up to my YL friends and acquaintances, but maybe things will become more clear if I am able to study things out more for myself. There are so many differing opinions out there about how to use essential oils–would be nice to just have some straight, hard facts.
I did a price comparison from various oil companies, including doTerra and Mountain Rose Herbs. The price differences seem to focus primarily on country of origin, followed by whether they were fair trade. doTerra, for example, sells Frankincense from Oman, and the wholesale price for 15ml is almost $70. Mountain Rose sells USA Frankincense at $20 for 15ml. Eden Botanical sells Frankincense from Somalia at $16 for 15ml. Scents of Earth sells Frankincense from Oman at $45 for 10 ml (or $67.50 for 15 ml).
Anyway, I found a local store that makes (distills?) their own. I enjoy going there to pick out and purchase my oils. Plus I love to support my community. However, I’m still stuck on the idea of food grade. My local place says their EOs are not food grade and shouldn’t be ingested. So do those MLMs do something to their oils to make them safe to consume or is my local place just saying that to cover their butts?
I love essential oils! I use NOW Oils because they are affordable and easy to find. I think Young Living and DoTerra are over priced marketing scams. I tell everyone I use NOW. I have great success using the more reasonable priced oils and they even make some of their own blends. Highly recommend but everyone needs to find what brand works for them.

Use the tips within AromaWeb's How to Buy Essential Oils article to guide you on what to look for when considering suppliers. Companies that use the terms "therapeutic grade" and "aromatherapy grade" may simply be trying to quickly convey to you that their oils were carefully chosen and tested for use by those practicing holistic aromatherapy. Some companies still have no idea that these terms are confusing.


Are they an eco-conscious company? One of the reasons I choose the essential oil (and herb) company that I use for my personal and business needs, is because of their sustainable practices. I am very passionate about being eco-friendly and when a business goes to such lengths to be a zero waste company as well as put time and money into other eco-conscious projects, I really have to take notice.
Having taught in universities and studied various healing arts modalities for over a decade, I unhesitatingly recommend Aromahead’s  Aromatherapy Certification Program to everyone – from beginner to daily user. The format is super user-friendly and content is beyond rich. The extensive case studies and amazing feedback set me on a great path of understanding how oils could be used to move the body into a deeper healing state. I now feel confident I’m moving into my aromatherapy practice in a mindful, safe, and ethical way.

"Peppermint is an interesting plant in that it yields more oil than most others. As such, large farms and distilleries extract a bunch of oil from the peppermint plant. Smaller farms do a first distillation of peppermint that they sell to oils companies for the highest price. The peppermint is then re-distilled at a higher pressure and higher temperature for a 2nd distill, and the resulting oil is sold for less money to soap companies, and the like, that want a lower cost oil, but still desire a slightly “herby” smell. The plant is then re-distilled one more time at a yet higher temperature and pressure for a 3rd distill, which is sold to companies wanting the candy-cane smelling oil."


I would highly recommend that anyone who is interested in essential oil toxicity to read this article regarding safety, including ingestion or neat application. I found it to be very helpful. It is a comprehensive article that was also published in an aromatherapy journal. Ron Guba, the author, is a well known Australian aromatherapist. http://www.agoraindex.org/Frag_Dem/toxicitymyths.html

I have always wondered why I have to pay so much more for do terra than AuraCacia oils and for that reason I am a fan of Aura Cacia. I recently learned that there are 1,2,3 and complete distillation and that first is the best. I unsure what either brand uses and don’t really know how to find out unless I get In direct contact with each company (not that hard). I want to buy some helichrysum italicum oil that through do terra is $100, Native American Nutritionals is $150 and aura cacia is $40. How can a consumer know if the $40 oil is just as good as the $150 oil? I believe they are all the same size. Are these companies taking us consumers for a ride? Thank you for your information.


There are so many essential oil brands on the market today it is indeed a huge industry. However, not all oils are created equal, and in fact most brands are simply not pure. They are often made synthetically, offering no benefits to your health and with some experts saying that they are in fact very toxic. Many “natural” smelling products don’t contain anything natural – no pure oils at all, just fake scents made in a lab.
We should also all remember that sometimes we might not like an oil initially just because its different and something we haven't smelled before, but with more experience we end up loving an oil. Some oils, like wine or beer are an acquired taste. When I first smelled Roman chamomile I hated it, but now its one of my favorites. Apparently I was not ready for it when I first smelled it. When our bodies are ready to accept things it will generally let us know. But there is nothing to be lost by listening to our bodies when it tells us to stay away from something, give it time and if it changes then fine but if its a permanent adverse reaction we should not try to force things.
I’m familiar with EO at one time I used YL the only problem with that is they were to expensive in my opinion. So I quit for awhile. I deal on a daily basis with fibromylgia,osteoarthritis and anxiety. Due to all this my doctor took me off of a sleeping pill said I was sleeping to much in the day plus I went to the library for a free class about sleeping patterns and I was told to get off the OTC sleeping meds. Wow want to talk about a withdraw plus the lack of sleep I was getting. I was like an owl still sleeping in the day up at night. I had to do something. My sister told me about piping rock that’s where she’d been getting her essential oils. So I got my Lavender and Bergamont and at reasonable prices.Their great I sleep well now.
Plus, I don’t care how wonderful an EO is, I don’t think a certain combo is going to make someone “Thankful” or give them “Couraqe.” Those are personality traits, not a response to treatment. Seems a bit hokey to me. I just gave her the catalog back and didn’t say much. The MLM system is designed to make people antagonize their friends into feeling obligated to purchase stuff.

Lots of it! The Aromahead team is a dedicated community of educators that are ready to assist you and offer guidance when you need it. All of our teachers are Certified Aromatherapists, and have been in the profession for many years. You’ll have access to Aromahead’s online forum, where you can ask questions, participate in discussions and learn from other Aromatherapists. Starting after Lesson 3, you’ll be assigned an individual instructor who is there to support your case studies throughout the remainder of the program. Plus, you can email us anytime, and your emails will always be answered right away.
Most avid essential oil aficionados understand that there is no independent standard for “Therapeutic Grade” that is universally recognized. Let’s be honest, it’s hard to even pin down exactly what does “therapeutic” entail in the first place, at least in any quantifiable aspect. And while you may not like the promotion of Therapeutic Grade by various companies, it’s not really correct to say that “thereis no such thing as Therapeutic Grade” because companies do have the freedom to make up any grading system they want. It’s just important to be aware that these grading standard are largely just marketing ploys by most companies. I think a better response to those promoting such an idea would be to say"while many companies promote their own therapeutic grade standard, one should be aware that there is no universally accepted independent body that certifies essential oils as therapeutic grade." That is a fair statement that is factually correct and nobody can refute. Using this language will not cause dialog to shut down between those on the MLM side and those on the more traditional side of aromatherapy.
Dr Gary G. Kohls is a retired physician from Duluth, MN, USA. In the decade prior to his retirement from medicine, he had spent the last decade practicing what could best be described as “holistic (non-drug) mental health care”. Dr Kohls has been actively involved in peace, justice and nonviolence issues for much of his adult life and, since he retired, he has written a weekly column for the Duluth Reader, an alternative newsweekly magazine (www.readerduluth.com). His columns mostly deal with the dangers of American fascism, corporatism, militarism, racism, malnutrition, psychiatry and other movements that threaten American democracy and civility.
The old adage, “you get what you pay for” is generally quite true when it comes to essential oils. Producing and distributing high quality essential oils is a time consuming and expensive process. If you find an essential oil at a price significantly lower than most major brands, you’re not getting a good deal, you’re probably getting a fake product.
Information offered on Herbal Academy websites is for educational purposes only. The Herbal Academy makes neither medical claim, nor intends to diagnose or treat medical conditions. Links to external sites are for informational purposes only. The Herbal Academy neither endorses them nor is in any way responsible for their content. Readers must do their own research concerning the safety and usage of any herbs or supplements.
Hey! I akso struggle with acne of all sorts. The best thing I have found is tea tree oil and lavender. I used to dilute it in jojoba oil and that worked great, but not fast enough for my upcoming wedding, so I dilute it in water now until it clears up. The tea tree oil is great for skin and the lavender helps with the redness and inflammation.but, the best thing you can do for your acne is drink lots of water, green tea, and dilluted ACV, exercise, and cut out processed foods, starting with refined sugar.
In Gas Chromatography, an essential oil is vaporized and passed through a long column to separate the oil into its individual components. Each component will travel through the column at a different speed, depending on its molecular weight and chemical properties, and is measured as it exits the column. Using this testing method, quality control analysts can determine which compounds are present in a test sample.
As the vaporized microscopic particles come into contact with the soft and moist tissue inside your nose and sinuses their beneficial properties enter directly into your bloodstream and get dispersed throughout your body. At the same time they travel up the olfactory nerve (the one that operates your sense of smell) to the limbic region of your brain where you process feelings and emotions. This is also an important area of the brain involved in memory. Smell and memory are processed through the same part of the brain; that’s why when you smell cookies baking in the oven you may have flashbacks of childhood.
The truth is that there are MANY company-developed therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? It’s important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by companies selling oils and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It's also important to know what the company defines as being "therapeutic grade." Does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let's face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgments about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil, not just focusing on the major components.
But…. and this is a very big but… like any medicine, they have a list of limitations and potential risks if they are not used correctly. Let’s examine some of them. Oh and if you don’t like rants, then maybe you don’t want to read this post (but you should because I make some very good points). If you’re a rep or a convert to brands like doTERRA and Young Living, I hope this helps you, because much of what you’ve been told simply isn’t true.
I just came across Organic Infusions and am curious as to how you like them. I haven’t seen that you’ve come back to this post and would love to hear some review on this company. I will go ahead and place an order for a couple things, (geranium and lavender) and see how they compare to Aura Casia that I’ve used for years. I also like Oshadhi, but it’s not a direct company. I have to agree on the doTerra and YL issue, very sketchy indeed and I’ve stayed away from them, more because I don’t feel that the people selling the product are trained enough. We shouldn’t be ingesting EO’s, that’s not what they’re for. I hope one of you will come back and review this company. Thank you =)
#3. EO’s if diluted properly (not neat) and ONLY certain EO’s are safe for children. Peppermint is not safe until at least 6 years of age, some say older, as it can be a mucous membrane irritant. Eucalyptus has a 1,8-cineole content, its not recommended for children until the age of 10. Very important for childrens safety to do due diligence…these are just a few that come to my mind right of way and why they aren’t safe for children. I know there is plenty of other oils that are safe for children diffused. Once older, then ok for application, diluted in carrier oil. I was told 2-10 years old is when you can start adding more EO’s to your child(ren) library, as they age, you can add more. Of course I know this is hugely a hot topic. It depends on who you ask when you can introduce EO’s to babies and children. I know the MLM say put them neat on babies feet. No ones feet (bottom) will absorb EO’s as we have glands on the bottom of our feet, not pores to absorb the EO’s.
#1 – It seems to me that Dr. Pappas endorses your favorite brand, since this is the brand Danielle uses (and there’s a $50 coupon for your favorite brand on this page!). I’ve read a bit about the bad blood between your favorite brand and Young Living. Are both companies legit w/o putting adultered oils on the market? Or is Young Living not as good a company in your opinion?
At NOW® we’ve established long-standing relations with our essential oil vendors, and we purchase our oils in large quantities that qualify for bulk discounts, which we then pass on to consumers in the form of everyday low pricing. We also sell direct to retailers instead of going through distributors, which can add as much as 30% to a product’s cost.
What you could do is use one of the safer mint essential oils as a flavoring. I have a great recipe for peppermint brownies and just made homemade ranch with Basil EO. If you have a highly tested pure oil than the therapeutic benefits are really great for using certain ones as flavoring in food or water. Always use a very pure oil that says safe for internal use on the bottle and that is on the FDA’s GRAS list. Peppermint is a great one to replace Wintergreen but Spearmint would also really work and has a more gentle effect in regard to its therapeutic properties.
Hi Julie, it is entirely possible that you have had an allergic reaction to one of the essential oils you ingested. It is possible that that the lemon oil might have oxidized in the bottle in the store, and this increases the risk of allergy. It’s also possible that you are simply allergic to one of those oils. It has nothing to do with detoxing – that’s a total myth.
Essential oils on the market were analyzed using GC-MS and the main ingredients of each essential oil were quantified. Analysis of the essential oil of Lavandula officinalis (lavender oil) showed that each sample had a different ratio of the contents of main ingredients, such as linalool, linalyl acetate, and camphor. In addition, some commercial lavender oils were analyzed by GC-MS for comparison with the Lavandula flagrans (lavandin oil) and the reference standard. As a result of this analysis, although the components of almost all commercial lavender oils were approximately the same as those of the reference standard, there were a few products that contained more than 0.5% of the amount of camphor in lavandin oil. This suggests that some lavender oil samples are mixed with lavandin oil to lower the price. Commercial essential oils of Melaleuca alternifolia (teatree oil) and Mentha piperita (peppermint oil) were also analyzed by GC-MS. Each of the peppermint oil samples had a different ratio in the content of its main ingredient. With respect to teatree oils, the amount of terpinens in each sample differed. These results led to concern about the efficacy of essential oils. For achieve the expected efficacy of essential oils, correct information on their ingredients should be available and quality control using instrumental analysis should be introduced.
Of course aromatic materials were used in Biblical times for various medicinal, religious and ceremonial purposes but these materials would not have been essential oils, at least not by todays definition of being steam distilled products. This would have been impossible given that steam distillation had not yet even been discovered! Most people attribute the discovery of true steam distillation to a Persian scientist named Avicenna (Ibn Sina) in the 11th century. There was certainly no steam distillation over 2300 years earlier in King Tut's time. Aromatic products used during these ancient times would have been of a crude solvent extracted nature using fats and pressed oils and the like and would not have been very concentrated (not to mention that extracted products yield very different chemistry than distilled products) and therefore their use cannot really be related to how we should use the steam distilled essential oils of today.
Demeter stands for products of the biological-dynamic economy way, which is the most sustainable form of land cultivation and ensures the continuous growth of the humus layer. As an international organic brand, Demeter is represented on every continent. The Demeter guidelines for biological-dynamic cultivation is in 38 countries and more than 3,500 companies with an area of around 100,000 hectare accepted. TAOASIS® is a member of the Demeter association for many years now.
Partly true. If an essential oil is distilled at too high a temperature, too low a temperature, or for too long, this *can* increase the concentration of toxic components or artifacts. But to say that *any* improperly distilled component is toxic is simply not true. Toxicity is not determined by whether a substance is a genuine essential oil constituent. Toxic constituents can also be formed during normal distillation, hydrocyanic acid (“cyanide”) being the classic example – in bitter almond oil.
Hi Robert – I know I’ve read that more than a few times in some of the main stream aromatherapy books and think I was told that in my aromatherapy classes – about the 2% thing. So, it is a perception that I myself also have and have, therefore, spent long hours trying to determine if my sources are selling me what they say they are and who my sources should be – long hours and dollars spent to attend conferences to rub elbows with those who should know. However, at that time in 2006, organic essential oils were not readily or at all available. I have also read and have been told by those who should know, that just because an oil is certified organic, there is still no guarantee that said essential oil is not adulterated or for that matter really organic. The argument that I was given was that no one stays around to make sure that the material actually placed into the still was the same that was grown in the organic soil. We live in a world of distrust and for good reason as we look around at the greed in high places. I know this doesn’t address your issues about your article but was and always will be interested in any discussion concerning what constitutes an unadulterated oil. That being said, I would think there are certain things to consider when purchasing an oil and the chances it may or may not be adulterated. Some oils are naturally inexpensive and there would be nothing gained by adulterating them. If you look at how many acres of a particular oil are said to have been grown for a particular year and for that same year there was a great more essential oil sold than could have been produced – then you know you probably have an issue. I know that you know far more about this issue than I do, but I would like to see more discussion concerning what things would throw up a red flag when purchasing an oil from a particular supplier. The internet is now so absolutely full of people selling essential oils and copying and pasting the same old information that it is a bit overwhelming. My concern is the same as other clinical aromatherapists and that is that people will try a particular oil, find that it doesn’t work because it is either adulterated or the person selling the oil really doesn’t have a clue which oil or chemotype should be used for a particular purpose, so the client then assumes that any and all claims made by the aromatherapy industry are false or vastly overstated. This is true in research studies that have been done as well. Is there an answer? I would like to see an article by someone as knowledgeable as yourself that gives you a list of possible red flags and things to consider when looking for suppliers, particularly bulk suppliers.

One of my biggest frustrations of late has been a MLM company, I won’t name names and start a whole “thing”, but they state that they have a patent on “certified therapeutic grade”. In actuality, if you research the information, the only thing that is patented, is the logo that states “certified therapeutic grade”. It has nothing to do with the actual product, just the advertising.
Robert you are the MAN! Thank you for being a voice of reason and knowledge. More importantly, thank you for calling people on their BS! To often people will be reluctant to speak up when confronted with individuals or companies spreading misinformation to further their agenda (and profit motive). Fact and fiction are not differences of opinion. Massage magazine should be ashamed. Instead they give an idiotic response, in essence saying, “we don’t know anything so it’s inappropriate that we educate ourselves before we send info out the our industry”.
Very simply, you want to read on the label — or information page for every oil — the true Latin name of the plant from which the oil was extracted, as well as the country from which the plant was harvested. Some companies will go further and tell you the method of extraction, the farming quality and also the chemical family of the oil. Plus seeing the batch number on the bottle helps you match it with its testing.
In comparing the structure of sclareol with that of any of the steroidal estrogen structures we can easily see that sclareol lacks the quad-ring system that define steroids, in fact there are only 2 ring structures in sclareol, making it nowhere close to a good fit in any receptor site that would be accepting of any of the estrogens. Furthermore, the two alcohol groups in sclareol, which likely play a key role in how the estradiol molecule reacts once attached to its receptor, are in very different proximity to one another compared to estradiol. Remember, molecules in biological systems have very specific ways, based on three-dimensional structure, in which they interact to accomplish their designed tasks. Hopefully, even without a chemistry degree, anyone can see that, based on the structural parameters of both systems, there is no way that sclareol could ever perform the function of estrogen in the human body.
Heavy Metal testing shows the amount of heavy metal content in the essential oil. When properly distilled, essential oils should not contain heavy metals. ICP-MS testing uses a high-energy medium called Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) to ionize the sample. The sample is then run through a mass spectroscope, which separates the sample into its elemental parts and provides a reading about which elements are present and at what quantities.

Cumin oil, which is safe to use in your food, can cause blisters if you put it on your skin.  Citrus oils that are safe in your food may be bad for your skin, especially if you go out into the sun. And the opposite is true, too. Eucalyptus or sage oil may soothe you if you rub it on your skin or breathe it in. But swallowing them could can cause a serious complication, like a seizure.
×